Oil, the Persian Gulf States, and the United States

By Võ Xuân Hân | Go to book overview

Introduction

PROLOGUE

The discovery of oil in the Arabian peninsula and the deepening involvement of American major oil companies opened up a new era of relationships that had ramifications far beyond the ordinary financial and commercial spheres. In the global political environment since the World War II, the original private profit motives have been eclipsed by the sober realization that petroleum has a unique strategic military and economic significance. American policy toward the Middle East in general and the Gulf ( GCC) states in particular has been dominated for many decades by strategic considerations in which energy security plays a central role. In the cold war environment, nothing can better testify to the importance that Western powers attach to energy security than their willingness to protect that security even at the risk of getting embroiled in a shooting local conflict or superpower confrontation. Before the end of the cold war, the Carter Doctrine of 1978 affirmed the United States' willingness to protect the Gulf's oil supply at all costs, including the possibility of going to war with the Soviets. In the postcold war period, the Gulf crisis prompted by the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in August 1990 and the ensuing war against the Iraqi forces have brought into sharper focus the importance that the industrial nations have attached to the question of global oil security that the Gulf represents. 1

Besides its military significance, oil plays a major role in the dynamics and stability of the world economy. After all, petroleum has been the major energy source that drives the modern industrial economies. Although opinions probably will continue to differ on whether or not oil was the sole motive for going into the war with Iraq, it seems most unlikely that war would have taken place at all if Kuwait were a country without oil such as Rwanda, and Iraq were her big neighbor to the North,

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Oil, the Persian Gulf States, and the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Energy Equation 11
  • 3 - The Lands and Their Economies 57
  • 4 - From Renting to Partnership 83
  • 5 - The Trade Connection 119
  • 6 - The Future 151
  • Select Bibliography 163
  • Index 169
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 173

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.