Oil, the Persian Gulf States, and the United States

By Võ Xuân Hân | Go to book overview

3
The Lands and Their Economies

A PHYSICAL PROFILE

The total land area of the GCC countries is approximately 2,475,190 square kilometers (approximately 28 percent of the United States). In terms of size, Saudi Arabia is the largest GCC states (over 2.1 million square kilometers) and occupies nearly 87 percent of the total area (Table 3.1). The second largest GCC state is Oman (9 percent of total area), followed by the UAE (3.4 percent) and Kuwait (0.72 percent). Bahrain, with a land area of only 620 square kilometers, is the smallest.

Geologically, the whole Arabian peninsula is a huge platform of ancient rocks that is tilted with the highest part in the West and the lowest part in the coastal East. 1 This rock formation makes the western part of Arabia rough and mountainous, and the eastern part rather flat. The East is the home of the sedimentary rocks where fossil fuel deposits were and will be discovered. This was where the history of American special relations with the Gulf began.

Generally, the Arabian peninsula has arid and extreme climactic conditions. This is due to the fact that the peninsula is basically covered with deserts. The oases are concentrated in the western coast ( Saudi Arabia), the central region ( Saudi Arabia), and the southeastern coast of the peninsula ( Oman). The presence of some surface water in the oases allows some cultivation, but there is extremely scarce irrigated land in the Gulf states. The existence of violent dust windstorms and hot weather near the center and high humidity in the coastal regions make life hash and precarious. These severe arid climactic conditions combined with the soil composition mean that agricultural activities are very limited with traditional methods and tools.

In short, the weather and soil patterns together with the lack of surface water have meant great difficulties and high costs for economically

-57-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Oil, the Persian Gulf States, and the United States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 173

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.