American Frontier and Western Issues: A Historiographical Review

By Roger L. Nichols | Go to book overview

in topics such as law, land policy, and capital mobilization, but also entrepreneurial and modernization theories could be tested in different environments. Finally, and perhaps the most difficult assignment, historians must somehow integrate new research methods and topics while maintaining the romantic appeal and literary flair that has characterized the best writing in Western history.


NOTES
1.
See, for example, Jackson K. Putnam, "The Turner Thesis and the Westward Movement: A Reappraisal", Western Historical Quarterly 7 ( October 1976): 377-404; Richard Jensen, "On Modernizing Frederick Jackson Turner: The Historiography of Regionalism," Western Historical Quarterly 11 ( July 1980): 307-22; Jerome Steffen, ed., "The American West: New Perspectives, New Dimensions" ( Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1979), pp. 3-6.
2.
Frederick Jackson Turner, "The Significance of the Frontier in American History," American Historical Association, Annual Report for the Year 1893 ( Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1894), pp. 199-227; Walter Prescott Webb, The Great Frontier ( Austin: University of Texas Press, 1951).
3.
Ray Allen Billington, Westward Expansion, 5th ed. ( New York: Macmillan, 1982); Billington, America's Frontier Heritage ( New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1966), pp. 159-79. Also see Ray A. Billington, "The Origins of the Land Speculator as a Frontier Type", Agricultural History 19 ( October 1945): 204-12.
4.
Joseph Schumpeter, The Theory of Economic Development ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1934), pp. 78-79, 93; Schumpeter, "The Creative Response in Economic History", Journal of Economic History 7 ( November 1947): 149-59.
5.
Arthur Cole, "The Committee on Research in Economic History: An Historical Sketch", Journal of Economic History 30 ( December 1970): 727-29; Kenneth W. Porter, John Jacob Astor: Businessman, 2 vols. ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1934).
6.
Porter, Astor, passim.
7.
Harry N. Scheiber, Ohio Canal Era: A Case Study of Government and the Economy, 1820-1861 ( Athens: Ohio University Press, 1969); Scheiber, "Entrepreneurship and Western Development: The Case of Micajah T. Williams", Business History Review 37 (Winter 1963): 345-68; Scheiber, "Alfred N. Kelley and the Ohio Business Elite, 1822-1859", Ohio History 87 (Autumn 1978): 365-92; Scheiber, "The Commercial Bank of Lake Erie, 1831-1843", Business History Review 40 (Spring 1966): 47-65.
8.
Gene M. Gressley, Bankers and Cattlemen ( New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1966); Arthur M. Johnson and Barry Supple, Boston Capitalists and Western Railroads ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1967); John L. Larson, Bonds of Enterprise: John Murray Forbes and Western Development in America's Railway Age ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1984).
9.
An especially concise description of the theory applied to American history is Richard Brown, Modernization, The Transformation of American Life, 1600-1865 ( New York: Hill and Wang, 1976), pp. 3-22.
10.
Brown, Modernization, passim; Richard Jensen, Illinois: A Bicentennial HIstory ( New York: W. W. Norton, 1978); Jensen, "On Modernizing Frederick Jackson Turner: The Historiography of Regionalism", pp. 307-22.

-42-

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