American Frontier and Western Issues: A Historiographical Review

By Roger L. Nichols | Go to book overview

been done on the role of women, but a recent study has some discussion of earlier examples of cowgirls interspersed among recent oral histories.61 Cowboys, as a topic, shades into discussion of cattle trails. Harry Sinclair Drago discusses the trails, Wayne Gard edited an eyewitness account of 1879, and Donald Worcester gives the most recent summary of trail history.62 Robert R. Dykstra, in a major study, examines the rise and development of the cattle towns at the end of the long drive.63 Dykstra places the cattle towns in a much wider context than just local history of the growth of a frontier town. He considers the urban as well as the frontier agricultural process.

Finally, on the frontier range, are Valgene W. Lehmann Forgotten Legions-- sheep. The subject of some derision by contemporaries and later scholars as inappropriate to be considered as part of the pioneer process, sheep raising was always part of the range economy whether on the Eastern or the Western frontier, and there have been a few studies since the works of Towne, Wentworth, and Kupper in the 1940s. Richard Beach offers some discussion of frontier conditions in his study of sheep raising in western Pennsylvania, while Virginia Paul gives a general view of the subject in the West. Two recent studies offer excellent discussions of sheep raising in Washington and in Texas, and although the authors cover many years, they discuss the beginning of the enterprises in the pioneer period.64

It is a truism that all topics need more study, and agriculture on the frontier is no exception. There is need of modern study of pioneer agriculture in many of the states. Although we do not have to establish an Annales school of American agricultural history,65 the interest in combining social science, geography, and ecology should be encouraged. More work is needed on the impact of agricultural development on the ecological environment and on the social environment of the agriculturists. The question of the relationship of competing cattle, sheep, and crop enterprises on the frontier needs study. There are opportunities to look at the process by which the activity quickly passed from frontier to commercial. Clearly, the need for more comparative study of agriculture in various American frontier regions over time exists. Particularly in the Western region there is need for a look at the social side of the pioneering process. What, in the early years, produced attitudes about resource exploitation and the significance of the frontier experience? Answers to these questions are necessary to be able to discuss Western agricultural history in the twentieth century, as called for by Gerald D. Nash.66 In essence, more work needs to be done not only on pioneer agriculture as a process, but also on the context in which that process took place.


NOTES
1.
Carl Bridenbaugh, Fat Mutton and Liberty of Conscience: Society in Rhode Island, 1636-1690 ( Providence, R.I.: Brown University Press, 1974), pp. xix-xx; John W. Caughey , "The Insignificance of the Frontier in American History or 'Once Upon a Time There Was an American West'", Western Historical Quarterly 5 ( January 1974): 5-16;

-60-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Frontier and Western Issues: A Historiographical Review
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 303

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.