American Frontier and Western Issues: A Historiographical Review

By Roger L. Nichols | Go to book overview

mands that scholars put Indians at the center of Indian history echoed across scholarly meetings. Although difficult, that task is by no means impossible, as recent studies have shown, and continuing emphasis needs to be placed on that approach. Some of the newest and most stimulating work combines ecological and ethnological data with a truly impressive clarification of Indian circumstances. All of these approaches provide opportunity for historians to develop theses for an ever clearer understanding of the past. One or some combination of them may provide an overall method or pattern that will help to explain the varied, complex, and even contradictory story of Indians in the United States.


NOTES
1.
Reginald Horsman, "Recent Trends and New Directions in Native American History", in Jerome O. Steffen, ed., The American West: New Perspectives, New Dimensions ( Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1979); Herbert T. Hoover, "American Indians from Prehistoric Times to the Civil War", in Michael P. Malone, ed., Historians and the American West ( Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1983); Robert M. Utley, The Indian Frontier of the American West 1846-1890 ( Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1984).
2.
Roy Harvey Pearce, The Savages of America: A Study of the Indian and the Idea of Civilization ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1953); Leslie A. Fiedler, The Return of the Vanishing American ( New York: Stein and Day, 1968), p. 75. See also Brian Dippie, The Vanishing American: White Attitudes and U.S. Indian Policy ( Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 1982); Francis Jennings, "Virgin Land and Savage People", American Quarterly 23 ( October 1971): 519-41; James Axtell, "The Scholastic Theory of the Wilderness", William and Mary Quarterly, 3d Ser. 29 ( July 1972): 355-66; Rayna Green, "The Pocohontas Perplex: The Image of Indian Women in American Culture", Massachusetts Review 16 (Winter 1975): 698-714.
3.
Richard Slotkin, Regeneration Through Violence: The Mythology of the American Frontier, 1600-1860 ( Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 1973); Michael Paul Rogin , Fathers and Children: Andrew Jackson and the Subjugation of the American Indian ( New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1975); Rogin, "Indian Extinction, American Regeneration", Journal of Ethnic Studies 2 (Spring 1974): 93-104. See also Robert Shulman, "Parkman's Indians and American Violence", Massachusetts Review 12 (Spring 1971): 221-39; Richard Drinnon, Facing West: The Metaphysics of Indian-Hating and Empire- Building ( New York: New American Library, 1980). For more balanced views, see Reginald Horsman, "Scientific Racism and the American Indian in the Mid-Nineteenth Century", American Quarterly 27 ( May 1975): 152-68, and Robert E. Bieder, "Scientific Attitudes Toward Indian Mixed-Bloods in Early Nineteenth Century America", Journal of Ethnic Studies 8 (Summer 1980): 17-30.
4.
Robert F. Berkhofer Jr., The White Man's Indian: Images of the American Indian from Columbus to the Present ( New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1978).
5.
Bernard W. Sheehan, Seeds of Extinction: Jeffersonian Philanthropy and the American Indian (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1973); Sheehan, "Paradise and the Noble Savage in Jeffersonian Thought", William and Mary Quarterly, 3d Ser. 26 ( July 1969): 327-59; Lewis O. Saum, The Fur Trader and the Indian ( Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1965). For discussions of other groups, see Linda K.Kerber

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Frontier and Western Issues: A Historiographical Review
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 303

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.