Censored by Confucius: Ghost Stories by Yuan Mei

By Kam Louie; Louise Edwards et al. | Go to book overview

The Blue-Capped Demon

In Yangzhou, a merchant by the name of Wang Chunshan had a troupe of professional actors in his permanent employ. One member of this troupe was a Suzhou man, Zhu Erguan, who was not only a talented actor but also extremely handsome. Wang decided to reward this outstanding talent and arranged for Zhu to live in a private garden outside the Xuning Gate.

One day the house neighboring the garden caught on fire, and before long the blaze had spread to Zhu's garden. Zhu fled for his life to the lane outside. On the western side of this lane, Zhu saw two lovely women leaning against a doorway waving to him. He approached them and asked if he could take shelter in their house.

The two beauties explained to Zhu that they were distant cousins of the Wang clan, and were thus related to Wang Chunshan.

The three were just getting acquainted when suddenly a man about fifty years old walked in and declared that he was the father of the two women. He was dressed in a leopard-fur coat and wore a blue cap. Confronted with his daughters in such a compromising position, he insisted that Zhu set things right and marry the girls.

While it was true that Zhu did rather fancy the two beauties, he was in no position to marry them. He came from a poor family that had no possibility of finding the necessary betrothal gifts.

He told the man in the blue cap of his plight and received the brusque reply: "Don't worry about it. I'll cover the costs."

Zhu then requested permission to return to his parents in Suzhou to tell them his plans.

The man in the blue cap replied: "By all means tell your parents, but don't let them worry about money or status. My daughters place great value in your looks.

"I have one request, though. Don't mention your marriage to my nephew, Wang Chunshan."

-104-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Censored by Confucius: Ghost Stories by Yuan Mei
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 223

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.