Learning, Creating, and Using Knowledge: Concept Maps as Facilitative Tools in Schools and Corporations

By Joseph D. Novak | Go to book overview
List of Figures
Figure 1.1 A concept map showing a graphical representation of the content of this book. Concept maps should be read from top down. Arrowheads may be omitted except on horizontal or upward linkages (p. 4).
Figure 2.1 Our meanings for experiences are a composite of our thinking, feeling, and acting (p. 10).
Figure 2.2 The Five Elements that comprise an educational event: learner, teacher, knowledge, evaluation, and context. All elements are present in an educative event and combine to construct or reconstruct the meaning of experience (p. 11).
Figure 2.3 Teacher and each learner has his or her own perspectives on the five elements operating in an educative event. The challenge is to reach a shared perspective on each element (p. 14).
Figure 2.4 Briefly stated, this is my theory of education (p. 15).
Figure 3.1 Characteristics of human learning showing variation on a continuum from very rote to highly meaningful. Only high levels of meaningful learning lead to creative production (p. 20).
Figure 3.2 A concept map dealing with the superordinate concept HISTORY showing second- and third-level subordinate concepts (p. 21).
Figure 3.3 My definition for Concept (p. 22).
Figure 3.4 A representation of the three memory systems involved in learning. Note that each system interacts with the other, both limiting and facilitating the acquisition of information. From Novak, 1980. Reproduced with permission. Copyright © 1980 by National Association of Biology Teachers (p. 23).
Figure 3.5 Humans have three distinct but interacting systems for learning, each of which has its own forms of information storage. Meaningful learning underlies development of cognitive structure, which strongly influences our affective and psychomotor learning (p. 26).
Figure 3.6 An early concept map constructed to show the structure of a novel. Novels can be compared and critiqued using such a conceptual framework. In later maps, lines linking concepts are always labeled to show specific relationships between concepts; that is, to form propositional statements. Reproduced with permission from Moreira, 1977 (p. 28).

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Learning, Creating, and Using Knowledge: Concept Maps as Facilitative Tools in Schools and Corporations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Figures ix
  • List of Tables xv
  • Preface xvii
  • Acknowledgments xviii
  • 1 - An Overview of the Book 1
  • 2 - The Need for a Theory of Education 8
  • 3 - Meaningful Learning for Empowerment 19
  • 4 - The Construction of New Meanings 35
  • 5 - Ausubel's* Assimilation Learning Theory 49
  • 6 - The Nature of Knowledge and How Humans Create Knowledge 79
  • 7 - The Effective Teacher/Manager 112
  • 8 - The Context for Education/ Management 153
  • 9 - Evaluation and Rewards 180
  • 10 - Improving Education in Schools and Corporations 202
  • Appendix I: How To Build a Concept Map 227
  • Appendix II: Procedures for Teaching VEE Diagramming 229
  • References 231
  • Author Index 240
  • Subject Index 244
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