The Cognitive Bases of Interpersonal Communication

By Dean E. Hewes | Go to book overview

6
The Conversation MOP: A Model of Patterned and Pliable Behavior

Kathy Kellermann

University of California, Santa Barbara

Conversational behavior is a study in seeming contradiction. On the one hand, conversation is an intricate interplay between interlocutors; on the other, it is the conveyance of common conventions. Conversation is adjustable and adaptive; it is regular and routine. Routines are available for everything from greetings to goodbyes, turn taking to topic sequencing, linguistically fixed expressions to sequentially dependent acts, and local to global coherence (see, for review, Clarke & Argyle, 1982; Coulmas, 1981; Craig & Tracy, 1983; Levinson, 1983; McLaughlin, 1984; Nofsinger, 1991; Wardbaugh, 1985). Yet, despite such routinization, conversations are not interchangeable events; they reflect a great deal of situationally adaptive and flexible behavior. Persons influence, adapt to, and accommodate the conversational behavior or others; they alter what they say to adjust to different hearers and to achieve different goals (see, for review, Cappella, 1981; Clark, 1992; Giles, Mulac, Bradac, & Johnson, 1987; Levinson, 1983). Conversational behavior is both fixed and flexible, methodical and malleable. Conversation is invention and it is convention, enacted without contradiction.

How can this be? How can conversational behavior be both ordered and changing, routinized and adapted, regular and adjustable? This seeming contradiction of conversational behavior lies not in its enactment, but rather in its study; not in its practice, but instead in its explanation. It is the study of conversation that expects routinization and is surprised by adaptation (or that expects accommodation and is surprised by convention). Inquiry tends to focus on either the fixed or the fashioned part of conversation, ignoring the simultaneity of stability and change in that behavior. Persons' ability to be simultaneously rou-

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Cognitive Bases of Interpersonal Communication
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.