Behavioral Medicine Approaches to Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

By Kristina Orth-Gomér; Neil Schneiderman | Go to book overview
3. Additional measures of occupational reward should be promoted, such as more flexible work schedules, time savings, extra-job services (e.g., nursery schools for working mothers, shopping facilities), or investments in job security.
4. Esteem reward should be developed by improving feedback from supervisors and strengthening teamwork across traditional boundaries of hierarchy. In this respect, segmentation of hierarchies may be an important structural prerequisite.
5. Opportunities for job training and requalification need to be strengthened. Counseling activities should be offered to those who lack motivation and to those who anticipate adverse events in their occupational career.

These and related structural measures should be combined with interpersonal and individual intervention. Thus, a new type of preventive effort in the field of occupational psychosocial health becomes evident. With the help of theoretical models, it is hoped that challenges of prevention can be met more successfully in the near future.


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