Behavioral Medicine Approaches to Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

By Kristina Orth-Gomér; Neil Schneiderman | Go to book overview

behavioral strategies that are learned, practiced, and applied during most phases of the disease. Continuity, long-term follow-up, relevance, and adequate educational principles facilitate learning, generalization, and maintenance. Such programs should be cost-effective because they can reduce morbidity. Behavioral medicine education and training seems to be the most adequate background for professionals responsible for these interventions. Programs for male and female patients need different emphases and profiles. Such programs have been shown to affect psychological well-being, quality of life, risk factors, morbidity, and mortality.


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