Reducing Prejudice and Discrimination

By Stuart Oskamp | Go to book overview

need not be a barrier to reducing intergroup prejudice, if openness to interactions with members of other ethnic groups is also encouraged.

The final chapter, by Stuart Oskamp and James Jones, reports on a prestigious nationwide survey of programs directed at racial reconciliation. This survey was part of President Clinton's Initiative on Race, and it collected information about "promising practices for racial reconciliation" -- outstanding examples of both local community-based groups and national programs directed at improving racial and ethnic relations in the U.S. The report of the President's Initiative is not a scientific document, but it deserves attention and dissemination as a broad survey of the current status of practical, operating programs to improve race relations. Accordingly, this chapter summarizes facts about the programs described in the report, classifies them in various ways, and discusses their goals, the methods by which they aim to reach those goals, the psychological mechanisms apparently implied by their methods, and the degree to which their efforts have been professionally evaluated. Such community programs should profit from using the research findings and theoretical principles for reducing prejudice summarized in the present volume, and in turn their activities will provide new challenges to researchers to explain their effects and improve their procedures.


CONCLUSION

The theories and research findings summarized in this volume give ample evidence that there are many possible paths to reducing prejudice and discrimination between social groups -- and also that each path has potential pitfalls that must be avoided if prejudice-reduction efforts are to be successful. Though much meticulous research has been done in experimental laboratories, the full test of the efficacy of their findings is to apply them through careful intervention research in real-world intergroup situations and in community-wide programs. We need many more such applied studies in order to determine the value and the limits of our current theories of prejudice-reduction approaches. Toward this goal, the contributors to this volume hope that their efforts will lead to better methods and more far-reaching success in helping diverse social groups live together peacefully, productively, and pleasurably.


NOTES
1
I want to thank the many people who facilitated this volume and the conference which provided its starting point, the annual Claremont Symposium on Applied Social Psychology. Most of the Claremont Colleges helped with financial support, Pomona College provided physical facilities, and President Steadman Upham of Claremont Graduate University hosted a dinner for the speakers. The chapter authors worked diligently to perfect their manuscripts, my colleagues Bill Crano, Ximena Arriaga, Cherlyn Granrose, and Catherine Cameron gave advice and encouragement, Jessica Johnson and Trina

-16-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reducing Prejudice and Discrimination
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 353

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.