Reducing Prejudice and Discrimination

By Stuart Oskamp | Go to book overview

which set of processes is primarily responsible for the SMTH effect. We regard this chapter and the work summarized by Sidanius and Pratto ( 1999) as merely preliminary efforts at such an explanation.

Despite the lack of complete clarity as to the ultimate sources of the SMTH, it is nonetheless quite clear that gender and arbitrary-set dominance systems are not reducible one to the other, nor purely additive. Further, this suggests that a complete understanding of the psychology of gender cannot be reached until we appreciate the distinct gender differences in the predisposition to generate and maintain arbitrary-set hierarchies by means of economic exploitation and physical violence. Most importantly, understanding of discrimination and outgroup aggression will not be complete without appreciation of the fact that males are both the primary perpetrators of intergroup oppression, and also the primary and deliberate targets of this oppression as well.

Finally, what does this perspective imply about our ability to attenuate and possibly eliminate both gender and arbitrary-set discrimination? Of course, the answer to this question is directly dependent upon a theoretical understanding of the forces and factors driving these various forms of discrimination. In general, social dominance theorists have argued that a primary reason for our seeming inability to eliminate the plagues of gender, ethnic, and class discrimination is the fact that we have not properly understood the etiology and functions of these phenomena. Social dominance theorists suggest that these forms of social oppression, rather than being merely products of "improper socialization," simple ignorance, or the exigencies of capitalism, are primarily the result of inherent features of human and primate social organization.

Thus, while social dominance theorists doubt that we will ever be able completely to eliminate these forms of social oppression, a more thorough and valid understanding of their underlying dynamics should at least put us in a better position to try to attenuate and control some of the most ferocious manifestations of these forces. On the other hand, it seems clear that the elimination of discrimination will not be possible until most dominant-group members are at least willing to admit that discrimination continues to exist in modern society. Unfortunately, current empirical evidence indicates that a large majority of American Whites are still in denial about this ugly reality ( Kearney, 1997).


NOTES
1.
However, it should be noted that this age system is not completely linear. Very old people (i.e., 80 years and above) do not always dominate over somewhat younger people (e.g., 60 year-olds).
3.
These were primarily Poles and Russians. See http://www.optonline.com/comptons/ceo/02246_A.html

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reducing Prejudice and Discrimination
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 353

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.