Neurobehavioral Plasticity: Learning, Development, and Response to Brain Insults

By Norman E. Spear; Linda P. Spear et al. | Go to book overview

7
The Effects of Gangliosides or Nimodipine on Promoting Behavioral Recovery in Rats with Septal Damage

Alex Poplawsky Bloomsburg University

It was 1970, my first year as a graduate student at Ohio University. As an undergraduate student at the University of Scranton I had limited exposure to studying the effects of brain damage on behavior, and it soon became apparent at Ohio University that this facet of physiological psychology would captivate my interest for a long time. One of our required books in a seminar on the limbic system presented by my advisor, David Johnson, was Basic Readings in Neuropsychology ( Isaacson, 1964). This book contained classic articles by Hartline, Kluver and Bucy, Papez, Bard and Mountcastle, Pribram and Kruger, and MacLean, as well as other original articles by notable researchers in neuropsychology. I have always had a deep appreciation for history and believe that the past provides us with significant insights for future endeavors. I was immediately attracted to the ideas and research of Robert L. Isaacson.

During my first year ( 1975) at Bloomsburg State College (where coincidentally the Nobel Prize Laureate H. Keffer Hartline had graduated in 1920), my best friend from graduate school, Linas Bieliauskas, was completing his clinical internship at the University of Florida. It was my first spring break as an assistant professor, and my wife Debbie and I were on our way to Florida. Linas arranged a meeting for me with Bob during my visit, and in his office filled with sailboats we spent over an hour discussing current research and ideas for future research. I found Bob extremely pleasant, easy to talk with, and a person with great insight -- someone I would like to know better.

-109-

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