Stereotype Activation and Inhibition

By Robert S. Wyer Jr. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Bodenhausen and Macrae say rather little about the nature of personal standards, generally considering situations in which these are in the direction of fairness or unbiasedness. One reason we think that personal stereotypes may be the default basis for perception is the relative primacy of self-related material in cognition. Bodenhausen and Macrae do not consider in much depth the role of self in the self-regulatory process. The SSM model explicitly includes a consideration of the salience of different selfimages and situational norms because these can provide some basis for predicting what kinds of standards will be invoked. Given motives for self-enhancement and self-protection, we can predict that when an intergroup categorization is salient, and in the absence of self-presentational demands, increased self-awareness should result in increased in-group bias, and more self-other differentiation (see also Simon, 1997). We would welcome an integration of the Bodenhausen and Macrae model with the social self-regulation model, as this could provide a way of including the self in the framework.


CONCLUSIONS

In conclusion, the role of inhibition in stereotyping may be more complex than is allowed in the apparent parsimony suggested by Bodenhausen and Macrae's model. Situations that call for stereotype inhibition may be akin to being asked to eat spaghetti with chopsticks -- difficult to do and demanding, if rather unusual. In characterizing these situations Bodenhauser and Macrae have done a considerable service to social psychology. The processes they have identified are important, and broadly we find their model quite compelling. Our comments are intended to open discussion and broaden the questions asked about stereotype inhibition to explore the generality of the processes, their relative frequency, and the extent to which they have consequences in more ecologically relevant settings.


REFERENCES

Abrams D. ( 1985). "Focus of attention in minimal intergroup discrimination". British Journal of Social Psychology, 24, 65-74.

Abrams D. ( 1990). "How do group members regulate their behaviour? An integration of social identity and self-awareness theories". In D. Abrams & M. A. Hogg (Eds.), Social identity theory: Constructive and critical advances (pp. 89-112). London and New York: Harverster Wheatsheaf and Springer-Verlag.

Abrams D. ( 1992). "Processes of social identification". In G. Breakwell (Ed.), Social psychology of identity and the self-concept. (pp. 57-99) San Diego: Academic Press.

Abrams D. ( 1994). "Social self-regulation". Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 20, 273-283.

-64-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Stereotype Activation and Inhibition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 269

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.