Brain Injury and Neuropsychological Rehabilitation: International Perspectives

By Anne-Lise Christensen; Barbara P. Uzzell | Go to book overview

Postscript

Barbara P. Uzzell

Anne-Lise Christensen

A single approach for rehabilitating brain-damaged individuals has not met with success in the past, as evidenced by individuals who have been nonproductive to themselves and to societies in which they live. The complexity of the brain and any injury to it requires an integrated, multidisciplinary approach for rehabilitation and a highly qualified staff.

During the past 5 years, knowledge about brain injuries has increased, making it possible to plan and execute more effective treatments. Lack of reality awareness of the brain injured has caused an increase in group methods and psychotherapy, which have been incorporated into neuropsychological rehabilitation when required by the premorbid personality and neuropsychological characteristics of an individual. Research in neuropharmacology is underway to discover how the brain and external agents administered at an optimum time course may promote recovery and improve functioning. Understanding the pathophysiology from current and future imaging techniques is critical to this process. The severity of the injury, acute-care treatment, age at time injury, and the presence of multiple injuries are factors affecting neuropsychological rehabilitation. Computers are being utilized successfully in treatments and as orthotic devices, but we need to know more about these treatments and devices.

Brain-damaged individuals do not live in a vacuum, but in families and societies throughout the world. Many factors impinging on brain-damaged individuals need to be addressed in treatment. Rather

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