Making and Unmaking the Prospects for Rhetoric: Selected Papers from the 1996 Rhetoric Society of America Conference

By Theresa Enos; Richard McNabb et al. | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Dianne L. Juby's essay serves as an example of Bitzer's contention that rhetoric should concern itself with invention. She examines the ways information retrieval specialists working with the World Wide Web are using Aristotelian concepts to organize databases, noting how helpful the topoi can be for facilitating online searches. For Juby, being able to study the disputes of other fields through the topoi could bring about the interdisciplinary potential of rhetoric. She writes, "The expansion of databases and documents from specialized disciplines available 'freely' on the World Wide Web . . . can force us out of [our] comfortable communities and into a cosmopolis of multidisciplinarity" (195).


An Allegory, a Song, and Conclusions

We end this volume with the Kneupper Memorial Address, given this year by Winifred Homer. It is appropriate that Horner's address, an extended allegory of rhetoric's place in the academy, should have the final word, since its theme of disciplinary kinship patterns illustrates the complexity and irrationality of our field's history. It is followed by the lyrics of the Composition Blues Band ( Barry Briggs, guitar; Larry Burkett, guitar; Clyde Moneyhun, guitar; John Warnock, bass; and Marvin Diogenes, lyrics and vocals), who entertained RSA participants at the opening reception. Together, Horner and the Blues Band remind us not to take ourselves too seriously.

The 1996 RSA participants did not sit down together to draft a set of documents outlining the future of rhetoric studies. Had we done so, no doubt the deliberations would have been contentious and exhilarating, just as those that led to the publication of The Prospect of Rhetoric. However, the good will present in Tucson, especially after a memorable outdoor fiesta complete with full moon and mariachi band, may well have brought about another revolution (if not another affair for Dame Rhetoric). Instead, we present to you a portion of the fine papers presented there, which together show the continued influence and vitality of other papers, on the same subject, published twenty-five years ago


Notes
1
In her paper for the 1996 RSA (forthcoming, online journal PRE/TEXT: Electra(Lite), http://wwwpub.utdallas.edu/~atrue/PRETEXT/PT.html), Diane Davis takes Patricia Bizzell's explorations a step farther. She writes, "If finite beings are not stable individuals but a mass of loose ends, what can it mean to be-with-one-another? This may be the question of our time. If what we share is our unsharable loose ends, then what we will necessarily give up in any common work effort or quest for solidarity is the very possibility for community" (6)
2
The first article on a woman rhetor was published in 1991 (Sutherland)
3
For instance, in his keynote address at the 1994 RSA, Edward Schiappa called on all rhetoricians to become involved in their communities, suggesting that no one had combined community service with academic work. After this oversight was brought to his attention, Schiappa graciously gave credit to

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Making and Unmaking the Prospects for Rhetoric: Selected Papers from the 1996 Rhetoric Society of America Conference
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 215

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?