Making and Unmaking the Prospects for Rhetoric: Selected Papers from the 1996 Rhetoric Society of America Conference

By Theresa Enos; Richard McNabb et al. | Go to book overview
African-American and feminist activists in the revision of that keynote, published in the 1994 Proceedings

Works Cited

Bender, John, and David E. Wellbery, eds. The Ends of Rhetoric: History, Theory, and Practice. Stanford, CA: Stanford UP, 1990

Clark Gregory. "Rescuing the Discourse of Community". College Composition and Communication 45:1 ( 1994): 61-74

Clifford James. The Predicament of Culture: Twentieth-Century Ethnography, Literature, and Art. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 1988

Covino William A., and David A. Jolliffe, eds. Rhetoric: Concepts, Definitions, Boundaries. Boston: Allyn, 1995

Crowley Sharon. Ancient Rhetorics for Contemporary Students. New York: MacMillan, 1994

Davis Diane. "Laughter". "Rhetoric Society of America Conf". Doubletree Hotel, Tucson. 2 June 1996

Ede, Lisa, Cheryl Glenn, and Andrea Lunsford. "Border Crossings: Intersections of Rhetoric and Feminism". Rhetorica 13 ( 1995): 401-41

Martin Emily. The Woman in the Body: A Cultural Analysis of Reproduction. Boston: Beacon, 1992

Miller Thomas P. "Teaching the Histories of Rhetoric as a Social Praxis". Rhetoric Review 12 ( 1993): 70-82

Mountford Roxanne. "Classrooms as Communities: At What Cost? in Things That Go without Saying in the Teaching of Composition: A Colloquy". Journal of Advanced Composition 15 ( 1995): 304- 07

Porter James E. "Developing a Postmodern Ethics of Rhetoric and Composition". Defining the New Rhetorics. Ed. Theresa Enos and Stuart C. Brown. Newbury Park, CA: Sage, 1993. 207-26

Schiappa Edward. "Intellectuals and the Place of Cultural Critique". Rhetoric, Cultural Studies, and Literacy. Ed. John Frederick Reynolds. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum, 1995. 21-27

Sutherland Christine. "Outside the Rhetorical Tradition : Mary Astell's Advice to Women in Seventeenth-Century England". Rhetorica 4 ( 1991): 147-63

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