Coercive Military Strategy

By Stephen J. Cimbala | Go to book overview

5
Collective Security and Coercion

The idea of collective action among states to preserve peace or punish aggression is as old as the state system itself. Some attempts at collective security have been formalized as interstate alliances; others have been ad hoc coalitions. It can be prudent to fight with allies, despite the increased difficulty of coordinating military plans and policy guidance among multiple players. The United States' war in Vietnam suffered for lack of moral influence in part because important American allies shunned, or opposed, the effort. In contrast, U.S. efforts against Iraq in 1990 and 1991 acquired additional legitimacy due to UN and allied support, including the support of key Arab and Islamic countries.

This chapter discusses the relationship between collective security and coercive military strategy. It begins by explaining the theory of collective security; continues with a consideration of crisis management and collective security; and concludes with an examination of collective security and conflict limitation or termination. At each stage of the discussion, this chapter focuses on the ways in which past concepts of collective security have become irrelevant or endangered by dimensional changes in the principal sources of conflict since 1945. International institutions and great powers have long designed their peace-support mechanisms for a world in which most wars are between states, and the most important wars are among great powers. That assumption became less and less tenable as the Cold War grew older; in the post-Cold War world, it has been deflated entirely. Further, new technology for warfare may make possible the instigation and termination of "virtual" or real conflicts at nearly the speed of light.

-113-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Coercive Military Strategy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 232

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.