Supreme Court Appointments: Judge Bork and the Politicization of Senate Confirmations

By Norman Vieira; Leonard Gross | Go to book overview
Save to active project

21
CLARENCE THOMAS: ENTER ANITA HILL

On October 5, just three days before the Senate's scheduled vote on the Thomas nomination, Timothy Phelps of Long Island's Newsday broke a story involving charges of sexual harassment against Clarence Thomas. The gist of the story was that Thomas, while heading the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), had talked to Anita Hill -- then a member of his staff and later a law school professor -- about various sexual matters and had repeatedly invited her to go out with him.1 Within hours, Nina Totenberg of National Public Radio broadcast a similar version of Hill's charges, followed by an interview with Professor Hill. These charges would soon provoke an explosive national debate over Judge Thomas's confirmation.

The White House, in conjunction with Republican leaders in the Senate, promptly began to circulate reports that Hill's story had been fabricated with the help of special interest groups opposed to Judge Thomas. It was also said that a Democratic senator or staff member had leaked the story at the eleventh hour -- after the committee had considered the harassment allegations -- in order to subvert the process and defeat the Thomas nomination. From the other side, women's groups accused the Judiciary Committee of not responding quickly or strongly enough to Anita Hill's charges. In order to determine which of these claims might be well founded, it is necessary to examine the genesis of those charges.


EMERGING CHARGES OF SEXUAL HARASSMENT

Early in the confirmation process, the Alliance for Justice received a tip, emanating from a Washington dinner party, that "a teacher at the

-209-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Supreme Court Appointments: Judge Bork and the Politicization of Senate Confirmations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?