The Structure of Wages in Latin American Manufacturing Industries

By Jorge Salazar-Carrillo; Juan J. Buttari et al. | Go to book overview

Appendix 3-3. Job evaluation manual
This job evaluation manual provides a standardized method for expressing qualitative requirements in terms of a categorical scale. The factors involved are:
Education.
Experience.
Degree of responsibility or initiative.
For its application in evaluating the various jobs surveyed, follow these instructions: Do not be concerned about the personal characteristics of each of the individuals occupying specific positions. Concentrate rather on the characteristics required for a satisfactory compliance with the tasks inherent to these positions.When carrying out such analysis proceed along the following stages:
First Stage: Evaluate each position separately with respect to the factors defined in this manual. Regarding each factor, consider first the definitions of the different evaluation level.
Second Stage: The evaluations must be tested for consistency after each position has been evaluated independently. This can be accomplished by comparing the evaluations for the different positions, for every factor, in order to check whether they are compatible with the characteristics (degree of difficulty, etc.) of each position.
Third Stage: Reconsider the evaluations for those positions which appear to be inconsistent when compared with all the others.

The information supplied by the firm should be utilized as much as possible following these three stages. If possible, this work should be done with the personnel manager, or a similar firm executive.


Qualitative Requirement Scales

Factor 1: Education

Education refers to the knowledge and skills developed through a learning and training program taken outside the firm or within it. In evaluating educational requirements the degree of difficulty of each position must be considered. Furthermore, the evaluation should be made in terms of the

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