Reading and Writing Acquisition: A Developmental Neuropsychological Perspective

By Virginia Wise Berninger | Go to book overview
Save to active project

PREFACE

Only relatively recently in the history of the human race has there been a great deal of interest in how children learn to read and write. The prior lack of interest is not surprising because until the advent of education of the masses only a small fraction of the population acquired literacy skills -- in general, religious leaders, scribes who made written records of business transactions, and children of the wealthy and ruling classes.

Interest in how children learn to read and write has been motivated by changes in the literacy requirements for employment as societies have moved from agricultural and industrial to technological economies. Even when public education became free to all, students with reading and writing problems were likely to drop out of school long before their peers who were skilled readers and writers, but these dropouts were still able to get jobs that required minimal or no reading and writing skills in agriculture or industry. In the United States, for instance, completion of elementary school was common at the time of World War I, but completion of high school did not become common until the World War II era. Increasingly, jobs in the post- Cold War era require education beyond the high school level. Thus, schools are under greater pressure than ever before to teach all children from diverse socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds to read and write so that they can complete the necessary education to compete in the work force. Those who do not become competent readers and writers can no longer quit school and be as likely to find meaningful, stable employment as was the case in the past.

Over the years, the question of primary interest about literacy acquisition has been about the best method for teaching reading and

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reading and Writing Acquisition: A Developmental Neuropsychological Perspective
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 223

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?