Reading and Writing Acquisition: A Developmental Neuropsychological Perspective

By Virginia Wise Berninger | Go to book overview

processes, of which many teachers and clinicians are unaware, and the practical considerations in assessing, preventing, and remediating reading and writing disabilities, of which many researchers are unaware.

Thus, this book is directed primarily toward an audience of undergraduate students in psychology interested in becoming researchers, for example, in developmental psychology, or practitioners, for example, in child clinical psychology, school psychology, or education. In addition, it should be of interest to (a) parents who want to ensure that their children optimize their reading and writing skills and/or want to understand why their children may have difficulty in learning to read and write, (b) basic researchers open to the issues facing practitioners who work with learning-disabled children, (c) and teachers and clinicians open to the contribution of research to improving educational practice.


Acknowledgments

The author thanks her husband, Ronald Berninger, for his extraordinary support, without which the research program featured in this volume would not have been started or completed. He contributed the term "peapod psychology." Also, this research would not have been possible without the participation of over one thousand students in the public schools of Bellevue, WA; Mukilteo, WA; Northshore, WA; Norwood, MA; Seattle, WA; Shoreline, WA; and in the Lakeside Academy, WA. The author is grateful to them and to the teachers, principals, school psychologists, and research administrators in those schools who took the time from their busy schedules to help make this research possible.

The author also acknowledges the contribution of colleagues and graduate students at the University of Washington to this research program. Robert Abbott gave generously of his time in providing statistical assistance for applying multivariate techniques such as structural equation modeling and for grappling with the unit of analysis issue. Donald Mizokawa created the computer programs for the initial experiment on levels of written language in developing writing and lent his expertise in psycholinguistics to developing coding schemes. James Morishima was instrumental in finding funding sources to initiate the research. Graduate students who contributed to data collection and/or analyses include Barbara Alsdorf, Russell Bragg, Ana Cartwright, Yuen Feng, Frances Fuller, Teresa Hart, James Johnston, Elizabeth Remy, Judith Rutberg, Hillary Shurtleff, Dean Traweek, Dianne Whitaker, and Cheryl Yates.

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