Black and White in Southern Zambia: The Tonga Plateau Economy and British Imperialism, 1890-1939

By Kenneth P. Vickery | Go to book overview

Preface

This study is based on archival sources, oral history fieldwork, published documents, and secondary literature. The first phase of research, supported by a Fulbright-Hays grant, was carried out in 1973-1974. I spent three months in London and approximately one year in Zambia. The time in Zambia was split about evenly between archival research in Lusaka and fieldwork in three principal sites on the Tonga Plateau, Southern Province.

In 1979 and 1983, supported by North Carolina State Faculty Development grants, I returned to London, Lusaka, and the Plateau for further research. I am indebted to the Institute for African Studies of the University of Zambia, the host institution, and specifically to Directors Jaap van Velsen, Mubanga Kashoki, and Robert Serpell. Among other things the Institute provided me low-cost housing in Lusaka and a comfortable tent for use on the Tonga Plateau. I am grateful also to the staff of the National Archives of Zambia.

I wish to thank the following persons: Jacob Hichoongwe, Daniel Mweemba and Nelson Simanego, my research assistants, hosts, and friends in Zambia; Leonard M. Thompson and David Robinson for encouragement and constructive criticism; Elizabeth Colson and Mac Dixon- Fyle, authorities on the Tonga Plateau; David Auerbach and Jonathan Ocko, computer wizards.

I am especially grateful to John Cell and Robin Palmer for encouragement and exacting criticism of the book manuscript. Palmer has assisted me on countless occasions over the past decade with references and advice drawn from his unrivalled knowledge of south central Africa.

Finally I offer heartfelt gratitude to my wife, Catherine Alguire, who beyond boundless other assistance drew the maps; and to my parents, Raymond and Clarene Vickery, for help in more ways than can be recounted or ever repaid. The book is dedicated to them.

-xi-

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Black and White in Southern Zambia: The Tonga Plateau Economy and British Imperialism, 1890-1939
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • RECENT TITLES IN CONTRIBUTIONS IN COMPARATIVE COLONIAL STUDIES ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vii
  • List of Tables ix
  • Preface xi
  • Notes and Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - The Plateau in the Late Nineteenth Century 13
  • Notes 29
  • 2 - The Imperial Economy in South Central Africa, 1890-1925: An Overview 35
  • Conclusion 48
  • Notes 49
  • 3 - Contact and Conquest, 1890-1904 53
  • Notes 67
  • 4 - A Colonial Situation, 1904-1918 71
  • Conclusion 112
  • Notes 113
  • 5 - Boom and Bust, 1918-1925 121
  • Notes 140
  • 6 - Transformation of the Indigenous Economy: The Emergence of a Peasantry 145
  • Notes 177
  • 7 - Peasants, Settlers, and State in the Copperbelt Era, 1925-1939 185
  • Conclusion 210
  • Conclusion 211
  • 8 - Epilogue and Conclusion 215
  • Notes 228
  • Bibliography 231
  • Index 245
  • About the Author 249
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