Black and White in Southern Zambia: The Tonga Plateau Economy and British Imperialism, 1890-1939

By Kenneth P. Vickery | Go to book overview

It is entirely believable that, without compulsory cooperation and the division of the internal market, many of the Tonga Plateau's white farmers would have been ruined in the late 1930s. In the longer run, however, the technical market division was not even the most significant aspect of Maize Control, since overproduction and unremunerative export were no longer problems for many years after 1939. Rather, the importance of Maize Control was that it marked the state's open commitment to large-scale settler farming, a commitment renewed many times in succeeding years. The Tonga could hardly regard this as anything but contrary to their own interests. But even state policy, though it clearly limited the expansion of the Tonga peasantry, did not destroy it. A niche carved by two generations of Tonga farmers was grudgingly recognized.


NOTES
1.
L. H. Gann, "The Northern Rhodesia Copper Industry and the World of Copper: 1923-1952," Rhodes-Livingstone Journal 18 ( 1955): 1- 18.
2.
GBCO, Northern Rhodesia Annual Reports, 1924- 1931.
3.
Gann, "Copper Industry," pp. 7-8; Gann, A History of Northern Rhodesia ( London, 1964), pp. 251-252; GBCO, Northern Rhodesia Annual Reports, 1932- 1938.
4.
GBCO Northern Rhodesia Annual Reports, 1930- 1936.
5.
NAZ KDB 6/1/1/1, Batoka Annual Report, 1936.
6.
The system was described succinctly by Mazabuka District Commissioner R. O. Ingram in 1931:

all labour required for Boma is in the nature of forced labour and therefore if one, so far as possible, recruits tax defaulters--or gives labour to men brought in for tax default--one lessens the number of men who have to be called in for Boma work; possibly against their will.

NAZ KDB 4/5/1/1, Ingram to Provincial Commissioner, 3/9/1931.

7.
NAZ KDB 6/7/5/3, Wick ens to Provincial Commissioner, 7/1/1933.
8.
NAZ KDB 6/7/3, Mazabuka Quarterly Report, 31/3/ 1931.
9.
Gann, Northern Rhodesia, pp. 283-284.
10.
E. A. Brett, Colonialism and Underdevelopment in East Africa ( London, 1973), pp. 175, 181-182.
11.
GBCO 795/17/18254 1927, Northern Rhodesia Native Reserves Commission(Line of Rail) Report, 1926(hereafter "Reserves Commission Report"), Evidence, vol. 2, pp. 437-438.
12.
Ibid., Evidence, vol. 2, p. 438.
13.
Ibid., Evidence, vol. 2, p. 439.
14.
Ibid., vol. 1, pp. 69-70.
15.
Ibid., vol. 1, p. 70.
16.
Ibid., vol. 1, pp. 24-25.
17.
Ibid., vol. 1, p. 71.
18.
Iibid., vol. 1, p. 73.

-211-

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Black and White in Southern Zambia: The Tonga Plateau Economy and British Imperialism, 1890-1939
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • RECENT TITLES IN CONTRIBUTIONS IN COMPARATIVE COLONIAL STUDIES ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Maps vii
  • List of Tables ix
  • Preface xi
  • Notes and Abbreviations xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - The Plateau in the Late Nineteenth Century 13
  • Notes 29
  • 2 - The Imperial Economy in South Central Africa, 1890-1925: An Overview 35
  • Conclusion 48
  • Notes 49
  • 3 - Contact and Conquest, 1890-1904 53
  • Notes 67
  • 4 - A Colonial Situation, 1904-1918 71
  • Conclusion 112
  • Notes 113
  • 5 - Boom and Bust, 1918-1925 121
  • Notes 140
  • 6 - Transformation of the Indigenous Economy: The Emergence of a Peasantry 145
  • Notes 177
  • 7 - Peasants, Settlers, and State in the Copperbelt Era, 1925-1939 185
  • Conclusion 210
  • Conclusion 211
  • 8 - Epilogue and Conclusion 215
  • Notes 228
  • Bibliography 231
  • Index 245
  • About the Author 249
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