Trademark Counterfeiting, Product Piracy, and the Billion Dollar Threat to the U.S. Economy

By Paul R. Paradise | Go to book overview

4
The Knockoff

The modern-day counterfeiting problem began in the years after World War II in the developing countries. Many developing countries had no local industry and turned to commercial counterfeiting to jump-start their industrial development. Other developing countries were formerly colonies; after they gained independence, their local industries turned to commercial counterfeiting.

"The Japanese were the masters of counterfeiting," says Paul Carratu, managing director of Carratu International, a private investigation firm based in London. Founded in 1963, Carratu International is one of the oldest firms engaged in investigating product counterfeiting. According to Carratu, in the years right after the war, the Japanese named different sections of their country after famous brands that were counterfeited. Hence, there was whiskey produced in Scotland and steel produced in Solingen.

Initially, the industrialized countries ignored the problem. Because the counterfeits were often of poor quality and were produced and distributed only to the local market, the counterfeiting posed little economic threat. Also, in the years right after the war, there was little that could be done legally. Most developing countries had few intellectual property laws.

The situation changed dramatically by the late 1960s. Advances in technology and the globalization of the economy made trademark counterfeiting a serious economic threat to any industry that had a portfolio of intangible assets. In the United States, one industry that was particularly hard hit by the counterfeiting losses was the garment industry.

Trademark counterfeiting erupted in the garment industry with the

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Trademark Counterfeiting, Product Piracy, and the Billion Dollar Threat to the U.S. Economy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Trademark Counterfeiting 1
  • Notes 19
  • 2 - The Worldwide Threat 21
  • Notes 40
  • 3 - The Trade Dispute with the People's Republic of China 41
  • Notes 70
  • 4 - The Knockoff 73
  • Notes 93
  • 5 - Street Peddlers and Flea Markets 95
  • Notes 110
  • 6 - Pursuing the Counterfeiters 111
  • 7 - The Entertainment Industries 127
  • Notes 173
  • 8 - The Pill Pirates 175
  • Notes 202
  • 9 - Nuts and Bolts 205
  • Notes 229
  • 10 - Piracy in Cyberspace 231
  • Notes 246
  • 11 - Public Education 247
  • Notes 257
  • Selected Readings 259
  • Index 261
  • About the Author 270
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 270

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.