Trademark Counterfeiting, Product Piracy, and the Billion Dollar Threat to the U.S. Economy

By Paul R. Paradise | Go to book overview

7
The Entertainment Industries

Historically, the entertainment industries have always battled piracy in one form or another. Book piracy was a huge problem in England during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries and played a great role in the development of modern copyright law. In the late 1800s, England had a problem at home and in the United States over the pirating of printed sheet music. In the United States, film piracy initially involved film theft. Losses were so great that in 1919 the major film studios formed the Film Theft Committee to fight the pirates. In the years after World War II, with the mass production of the 16-mm motion picture projector, a market for pirated prints developed. The market for pirated prints peaked during the 1960s, with much of the market consisting of film collectors, resorts, hotels, and colleges.

Since the mid- 1960s, the piracy problem in the entertainment industries has been largely a problem of unauthorized copying. In the music industry and in the motion picture industry, high-speed duplicators have made copying the entertainment product an easy startup operation. In the publishing industry, photocopiers have made copying a book quick and inexpensive.

The entertainment industries are particularly vulnerable to the theft of intellectual property. By the mere act of purchasing a legitimate product, a pirate has a master that can be used for starting up production. No other industrial sector has such a naked vulnerability.

For the entertainment industries, not only are the products easy to duplicate, but profitability in the music industry and the motion picture industry rests on a few products and a handful of big-name artists. For example, CBS Records was the industry leader in 1987, but derived much

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Trademark Counterfeiting, Product Piracy, and the Billion Dollar Threat to the U.S. Economy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Trademark Counterfeiting 1
  • Notes 19
  • 2 - The Worldwide Threat 21
  • Notes 40
  • 3 - The Trade Dispute with the People's Republic of China 41
  • Notes 70
  • 4 - The Knockoff 73
  • Notes 93
  • 5 - Street Peddlers and Flea Markets 95
  • Notes 110
  • 6 - Pursuing the Counterfeiters 111
  • 7 - The Entertainment Industries 127
  • Notes 173
  • 8 - The Pill Pirates 175
  • Notes 202
  • 9 - Nuts and Bolts 205
  • Notes 229
  • 10 - Piracy in Cyberspace 231
  • Notes 246
  • 11 - Public Education 247
  • Notes 257
  • Selected Readings 259
  • Index 261
  • About the Author 270
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