Trademark Counterfeiting, Product Piracy, and the Billion Dollar Threat to the U.S. Economy

By Paul R. Paradise | Go to book overview
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The majority of counterfeit products were discovered by visual detection.
The reports embraced virtually all classes of products, but antibiotics appeared to be the most common.

The WHO workshops are unique in that they represent a worldwide effort to address the counterfeiting problem. The only other worldwide initiative is that being conducted by the Counterfeiting Intelligence Bureau (CIB) in London, which has organized a Countertech and Counterforce organization for tackling the international problem.

According to Dr. ten Ham, the workshop still had much to accomplish, but unfortunately, there was no more funding. Lack of funding has always been a problem for WHO programs, which are funded almost entirely by the developing nations. At the end of 1995, unpaid contributions from member states totaled $243 million, with the rate of collection during the year amounting to 53 percent, the lowest in WHO history. At its World Assembly, a resolution was passed "expressing deep concern" at the unprecedented level of outstanding contributions. 32


NOTES
1.
"African Fake Vaccines Debacle Hits Merieux, SB", Pharma Marketletter, September 2, 1996, p. 17.
2.
Dixie Fairley, "Counterfeit Pills Buy Prison Time", FDA Consumer, December 1990, p. 35.
3.
Christopher S. Wren, "U.N. Report Says Tens of Millions Use Illicit Drugs", New York Times, June 26, 1997, p. A12.
4.
"Quelle Qualité pour les médicaments disponibles au Cambodge?" in the July 1997 newsletter of ReMeD, pp. 1-5.
5.
"Heart Pumps", Associated Press, May 10, 1978.
6.
Richard Turcsik, "Counterfeit Similac Found in California", Supermarket News, February 27, 1995, p. 35.
7.
Marian Segal, "Drug Counterfeiter Sentenced", FDA Consumer, September 1990, p. 41. See also Gregg Williams, "Sting Operation Nabs Iranian Counterfeit Drug Dealer", FDA Consumer, April 1989, pp. 37-38.
8.
Glenn Collins, "What if Congress Reforms the F.D.A.? Investors Should Think about It Now", New York Times, March 26, 1995.
9.
See "US House Votes to Bar Abortion-Inducing Drugs' Approval", in the Pharma Marketletter, July 6, 1998, p. 12.
10.
Saul Friedman, "Assault on FDA Would Be Bitter Pill, Agency Says", New York Newsday, February 23, 1995, p. A39.
11.
Christine Gorman, "Special Report: Drug Safety. Can Drug Firms Be Trusted?" Time, February 10, 1992, pp. 42-44.
12.
"Halcion a Matter for Justice Dept." in Scrip No. 2135, June 7, 1996, p. 17.

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