Trademark Counterfeiting, Product Piracy, and the Billion Dollar Threat to the U.S. Economy

By Paul R. Paradise | Go to book overview

unregulated and untaxed electronic marketplace. 14 The nonbinding report was the result of fifteen months of work by a task force made up of government officials and representatives from the Internet industry. The task force advocated a laissez-faire commercial environment as the best means for the Internet to develop. Although some critics lamented the tax-free environment, all were unanimous in support of the task force's recommendations that industry and government work together to develop further protection of intellectual property on the Internet.


NOTES
1.
Robert Dominguez, "Online Bootlegging a Net Loss for U2," New York Daily News, November 19, 1996.
2.
John Markoff, "U.S. Is Urged to Offer More Data on Line," New York Times, May 4, 1998, p. D6.
3.
Kirsten Danis, "Hoboken Man Roots Out On-line Fraud," Jersey Journal, November 21, 1995.
4.
Clinton Wilder, "How Safe Is the Internet?" Information Week, December 12, 1994, p. 13.
5.
See "Defense Computers Prove an Easy Target for Host of Hackers," Star- Ledger, May 23, 1996.
6.
See Daniel Ichbiah and Susan L. Knepper, The Making of Microsoft, Prima Pub., 1991, chapter 2.
7.
Tim Barkow, "The Domain Name System," Wired, September 1996, p. 84.
8.
Philip Elmer-Dewitt, "Nabbing the Pirates of Cyberspace," Time, June 13, 1994, p. 63.
9.
Robert Levine, "ABC Television Boots Concert-tape Traders off its America Online Site," Rolling Stone, September 5, 1996, p. 25.
10.
Jason Chervokas, "Internet CD Copying Tests Music Industry," New York Times, April 6, 1998, p. D3.
11.
Jennifer Nally, "Student Accused of Internet Violation," Crescent, October 1997.
12.
Greg Norman, "Student Web Pages Break Copyright Laws," Rice Thresher, December 5, 1997.
13.
Philip Manchester, "Anomalies across International Borders," Financial Times, November 6, 1996, pp. 35-36.
14.
McAllester and William Douglas, "Clinton's Ideal Internet," New York Newsday, July 2, 1997, pp. A3, A33.

-246-

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