Langston Hughes: Folk Dramatist in the Protest Tradition, 1921-1943

By Joseph McLaren | Go to book overview

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

McLaren, Joseph.

Langston Hughes : folk dramatist in the protest tradition, 1921-1943 / Joseph McLaren ; foreword by Beth Turner ; afterword by James V. Hatch. p. cm.--(Contributions in Afro-American and African studies, ISSN 0069-9624 ; no. 181) Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-313-28719-8 (alk. paper) 1. Hughes, Langston, 1902-1967--Dramatic works. 2. Folk drama, American--Afro-American authors--History and criticism. 3. Protest literature, American--History and criticism. 4. Afro-Americans in literature. 5. Afro-Americans--Folklore. 6. Folklore in literature. I. Title. II. Series. PS3515.U274Z678 1997 812'.52-dc20 95-48416

British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data is available.

Copyright © 1997 by Joseph McLaren

All rights reserved. No portion of this book may be reproduced, by any process or technique, without the express written consent of the publisher.

Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 95-48416

ISBN: 0-313-28719-8

ISSN: 0069-9624

First published in 1997

Greenwood Press, 88 Post Road West, Westport, CT 06881 An imprint of Greenwood Publishing Group, Inc.

Printed in the United States of America

∞•

The paper used in this book complies with the Permanent Paper Standard issued by the National Information Standards Organization (Z39.48-1984).

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

Copyright Acknowledgments

The author and publisher gratefully acknowledge permission for use of the following material:

Excerpts from Mule Bone, by Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston. Edited by George Bass and Henry Louis Gates, Jr. New York: HarperCollins, 1991. Used with permission.

Excerpts from unpublished works of Langston Hughes. Used with permission of Harold Ober Associates, Inc., and the Estate of Langston Hughes. Unpublished works of Langston Hughes are copyright © 1997 by Arnold Rampersad and Ramona Bass, administrators c.t.a. of the Estate of Langston Hughes.

Every reasonable effort has been made to trace the owners of copyright materials in this book, but in some instances this has proven impossible. The author and publisher will be glad to receive information leading to more complete acknowledgments in subsequent printings of the book and in the meantime extend their apologies for any omissions.

-iv-

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Langston Hughes: Folk Dramatist in the Protest Tradition, 1921-1943
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Publication/Copyright Page iv
  • Dedication Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Note xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Abbreviations xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • Endnotes 12
  • Chapter 1 - Folk Comedy in Collaboration: The Mule Bone Affair 17
  • Endnotes 29
  • Chapter 2 - Radical Drama and the Black Community 33
  • Endnotes 54
  • Chapter 3 - The Tragic Mode: Mulatto 59
  • Endnotes 74
  • Chapter 4 - The Gilpin Players and the Karamu Comedies 79
  • Endnotes 97
  • Chapter 5 - The Karamu Tragedies 101
  • Endnotes 114
  • Additional Info *
  • Chapter 6 - The Harlem Suitcase Theatre 117
  • Endnotes 136
  • Chapter 7 - Community Theatre, Black Iconography, and World War II 141
  • Notes 159
  • Notes 165
  • Notes 170
  • Afterword 173
  • Bibliography 175
  • Index 181
  • About the Author *
  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Afro-American and African Studies *
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