Transformations of Language in Modern Dystopias

By David W. Sisk | Go to book overview

Copyright Acknowledgments
The author and publisher gratefully acknowledge permission for use of the following material:
Excerpts from The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood. Copyright © 1985 by O. W. Toad, Ltd. First American Edition 1986. Reprinted by permission of Houghton Mifflin Co. All rights reserved; reprinted by permission of Jonathan Cape, a division of Random House UK Ltd.; used by permisison, McLelland & Stewart, Inc.
Excerpts from "Tightrope-Walking Over Niagara Falls," by Geoff Hancock, pages 191-220 in Margaret Atwood: Conversation edited by Earl G. Ingersoll ( Princeton, NJ: Ontario Review Press, 1990) are reprinted by permission of Ontario Review Press.
Excerpts from A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess. Copyright © 1962, 1989, renewed 1990 by Anthony Burgess. Reprinted by permission of W. W. Norton & Company, Inc.; reprinted by permission of William Heinemann Ltd.
Excerpts from Language and Politics by Noam Chomsky, edited by C. P. Otero ( Montreal: Black Rose Books, 1988) are reprinted with the kind permission of Black Rose Books.
Excerpts from Native Tongue by Suzette Haden Elgin ( London: The Women's Press Ltd., 1985) are reprinted by permission of Suzette Haden Elgin.
Excerpts from "A Limited Perfection: Dystopia as Logos Game" by R. E. Foust, originally printed in Mosaic, Volume 15, Number 3 ( September 1982): pages 79-88. Reprinted by permission of Mosaic.
Excerpts from Riddley Walker by Russell Hoban ( New York: Washington Square Press, 1982) are reprinted by permission of David Higham Associates (reference: Hoban/26.6.97).
Excerpts from Brave New World by Aldous Huxley. Copyright 1932, 1960 by Aldous Huxley. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc.; reprinted by permission of Chatto & Windus and Mrs. Laura Huxley.
Excerpts from Utopia and Anti-Utopia in Modern Times by Krishan Kumar ( Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1987) are reprinted by permission of Basil Blackwell Publishers.
Excerpts from Aldous Huxley: Satire and Structure by Jerome Meckier ( London: Chatto & Windus, 1969) are reprinted by permission of Chatto & Windus.
Excerpts from "Why I Write" in Such Were the Joys by George Orwell, copyright © 1953 by Sonia Brownell Orwell and renewed 1981 by Mrs. George K. Perutz, Mrs. Miriam Gross, and Dr. Michael Dickson , Executors of the Estate of Sonia Brownell Orwell, reprinted by permission of Harcourt Brace & Company.
Excerpts from "The Prevention of Literature" in The Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters of George Orwell, Volume IV: In Front of Your Nose, 1945-1950, copyright © 1968 by Sonia Brownell Orwell and renewed 1996 by Mark Hamilton, Literary Executor of the Estate of Sonia Brownell Orwell, reprinted by permission of Harcourt Brace & Company; reprinted by permission of Martin Secker and Warburg Ltd.
Excerpts from "Politics and the English Language" in Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays by George Orwell, copyright © 1946 by Sonia Brownell Orwell and renewed 1974 by Sonia Orwell, reprinted by permission of Harcourt Brace & Company.
Excerpts from "Politics Vs. Literature: An Examination of 'Gulliver's Travels'" in Shooting an Elephant and Other Essays by George Orwell, copyright © 1950 by Sonia Brownell Orwell and renewed 1978 by Sonia Pitt-Rivers, reprinted by permission of Harcourt Brace & Company.
Excerpts from Nineteen Eighty-four by George Orwell, copyright © 1949 by Harcourt Brace & Company and renewed 1977 by Sonia Brownell Orwell, reprinted by permission of the publisher; reprinted by permission of Mark Hamilton as Literary Executor of the Estate of the late Sonia Brownell Orwell, and Martin Seeker & Warburg Ltd.
Excerpts from Cosmic Satire in the Contemporary Novel by John W. Tilton ( Cranbury, NJ: Associated University Presses, 1977) are reprinted by permission of Associated University Presses, Inc.

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