Associated Systems Theory: A Systematic Approach to Cognitive Representations of Persons

By Robert S. Wyer | Go to book overview
Save to active project

10
AST Revisited: On the Many Facets of Impressions and Theories

Donal E. Carlston Cheri W. Sparks Purdue University

The diverse nature of these perceptive commentaries (see chaps. 2-9) reminds us of the poem about three blind men who encounter an elephant. As the reader may recall, one took hold of the trunk, one the tusk, and one the tail, and each described the same creature in starkly different terms. The poem is apropos whether one considers the elephant to represent intangible cognitive representations, or the more opaque facets of Associated System Theory (AST), because in either case it is hard to see these things clearly. Consequently, there are different ways to construe these "elephants," and at times different people may envision the same underlying creature in quite different ways.

We do not mean to imply that the commentators for this volume are blind or that their descriptions are in error. After all, in the poem, the various descriptions of the unseen elephant were essentially accurate, as far as they went. Similarly, the perceptions detailed in the various commentaries are, for the most part, quite insightful. Yet, in one way or another, we have all have managed to get a hold of something different. One challenge for this chapter is to show how the ideas touched on by commentators in the previous chapters fit together with the ideas that AST is groping to understand and explain. Perhaps by assembling and comparing these myriad insights, we can begin to piece together the nature of the illusive things that we are trying to describe.

The authors of most past target chapters have elected to organize their replies thematically, citing the commentaries at the various points where they became relevant. This has allowed them to organize their comments logically, and to proceed without tangent or redundancy through the points

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Associated Systems Theory: A Systematic Approach to Cognitive Representations of Persons
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 235

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?