Assessment in Higher Education: Issues of Access, Quality, Student Development, and Public Policy

By Samuel J. Messick | Go to book overview

PREFACE

This volume commemorates the career contributions to research on higher education of Warren W. Willingham. It contains the proceedings of a conference held in his honor at Educational Testing Service in March, 1995, along with introductory and concluding chapters and interstitial commentary by the editor.

As indicated by perusal of Willingham's bibliography, which directly follows this Preface, his work addresses most of the major issues that animated higher education over the past half-century. Accordingly, both the conference and this volume were organized around some of these salient issues having increasing currency for the 1990s. These include enhancing student access, development, and success in higher education; transforming admissions testing to meet expanding educational needs; resolving the politics of accountability by assessing quality outcomes of higher education; accommodating human diversity with equity and fairness; and, capitalizing on computer and audiovisual technology to prepare students for a technology-dominated future.

Neither the conference nor this volume could have occurred without the help of many people. Special thanks go to Nancy Cole, Henry Braun, and Ernest Anastasio for their support of the enterprise. Acknowledgments are also gratefully extended to the following individuals who served as chairpersons or discussants at the conference:

Ernest Anastasio, Executive Vice President, ETS
Joan Baratz-Snowden, Deputy Director, Education Issues, American Federation of Teachers
Henry Braun, Vice President, ETS Paula Brownlee, President, Association of American Colleges and Universities
Nancy Cole, President, ETS Frederick Dietrich, Vice President, The College Board Eleanor Horne, Corporate Secretary, ETS Donald Steward, President, The College Board

Thanks are also due to Kathleen Howell for her assistance in making travel and conference arrangements and for transcribing conference presentations.

-xiii-

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