Assessment in Higher Education: Issues of Access, Quality, Student Development, and Public Policy

By Samuel J. Messick | Go to book overview

3
ASSESSMENT TO IMPROVE COLLEGE
INSTRUCTION

K. Patricia Cross University of California, Berkeley

Once upon a time when both Warren and I were young, I was asked to review Warren's book on Success in College ( Willingham, 1985), along with three other books speaking to the general theme of "Making College Students Successful" ( Cross, 1985). I commented at the time that Warren's book stood out as the most scholarly of the four. By characterizing his work as "scholarly," I meant that he proceeded in an orderly and analytic way to build new knowledge on the foundations of what was already known about the success of students in college. Many researchers today do a pretty good job of writing about their own little corner of the research domain, but then they leave their pieces of new information scattered about the landscape, hoping perhaps that someday someone may be able to stack them to build a significant piece of knowledge. Warren is typically generous and scholarly as he contributes his work to the building of knowledge.

Using Warren's characteristic approach to scholarship as my model, I want to begin this chapter by recognizing some of the past work that has gone into research on college teaching. Effective teaching is one of the most important handles we have on helping students to become successful learners. And it becomes even more important as increasing numbers of students enter college without adequate habits or skills for learning.

Some of the work on college teaching attempts to describe the characteristics of good college teachers. The descriptions range from global essays, to extensive lists of behavioral characteristics, to a reduction to the parsimonious, basic dimensions of good teaching. The global images are perhaps best captured by essayists. Joseph Epstein ( 1981) book, Masters: Portraits of Great Teachers, for example, is a collection of essays written by former students of some exceptional teachers. While I am struck by the rich variety in both authors and teachers,

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Assessment in Higher Education: Issues of Access, Quality, Student Development, and Public Policy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 261

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.