Teaching Secondary English: Readings and Applications

By Daniel Sheridan | Go to book overview

APPENDIX D
Early Drafts: Changes in School

A group of tenth graders were asked, on the first day of school in the fall, to write a short paper on "one thing you would like to see changed in school." This rather vague assignment produced a set of rough drafts that students brought to class the next day. The following papers have been adapted from that set.

A. Finding a topic to write on seems to be a problem because of all the problems at school. But it is the same in all the school systems in the United States.

Whether it is a big school or a little school they all have the one problem. Prejudice. Either the complaint is farmers and city folk or towners and outof-towners. In the big cities it is gangs that go after each other.

Now to go on. In our school it is the same. Students from the military base are mistreated by people from town. Town people sometimes gang up and jump a guy from the base just to be nasty. I think students should get together. There are not enough clubs or social activities to bring these two groups together.

Teachers also go this way. Some teachers look down on students who come from out that way. Some even go so far as to give them a lower grade. Some teachers look at basers as troublemakers. If there is ever a fight against a baser or a towner some people might look down on a baser.

Basers present the same difficulty. Many will look at towners and spit on their shoes. Others will just walk away and not listen or something else like that. Basers have habits of forming their own cliques also. Here it is not as bad as in New York with its street gangs. But if we don't do something to control it, it might get out of hand.

To conclude I suggest that things be done to prevent it. Maybe students could get together and sort things out. But again we arise to that problem. A towner won't lower himself to talk with a baser and vise versa. This report is a little exaggerated, but maybe it should be to get the point across.

B. I think that the change they need in education is a relaxing class. They should have chairs that are cushioned so that the enviroment is comfortable. Then since you were pleased you probably listen and learn more. Do fun things like field trips, and going outside you can learn alot more outside and not under a roof most of your life. You can learn alot more if you are out by your self trying to survive then you can coming into the same old pail rooms and the same uncomfortable chairs. They should be able to go to a lounge where kids could smoke, although that is not legal in public build

-395-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teaching Secondary English: Readings and Applications
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - English Teachers 1
  • 2 - Teaching Literature 42
  • 3 - Teaching Writing 119
  • 4 - Teaching about Language 197
  • Appendix A - Sample Outline Syllabus 220
  • Appendix B - Description of Contemporary English 222
  • 5 - What to Teach 283
  • 6 - Joining the Profession 365
  • Appendix A - Classroom Activities 375
  • Appendix B - Childhood Toy Papers 381
  • Appendix C - Hundred-Year Birthday Papers 386
  • Appendix D - Early Drafts: Changes in School 395
  • Appendix E - Comparison Assignment: Then-Now/There-Here Papers 400
  • Appendix F - Sentence Exercises 408
  • Index 419
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 421

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.