Phonological Processes in Literacy: A Tribute to Isabelle Y. Liberman

By Susan A. Brady; Donald P. Shankweiler et al. | Go to book overview

reading instruction that follows may be one of the most promising areas in which to spend our limited research dollars. We hope that programs such as those described here will ultimately make it possible to reduce the incidence of reading failure.


REFERENCES

Ball E., & Blachman B. ( 1988). "Phoneme segmentation training: Effect on reading readiness". Annals of Dyslexia, 38, 208-225.

Blachman B. ( 1984). "Language analysis skills and early reading acquisition". In G. Wallach & K. Butler (Eds.), "Language learning disabilities in school-age children" (pp. 271-287). Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins.

Blachman B. ( 1987). "An alternative classroom reading program for learning disabled and other low-achieving children". In R. Bowler (Ed.), Intimacy with language. A forgotten basic in teacher education (pp. 49-55). Baltimore: The Orton Dyslexia Society.

Blachman B. ( 1989). "Phonological awareness and word recognition: Assessment and intervention". In A. G. Kamhi & H. W. Catts (Eds.), Reading disabilities. A developmental language perspective (pp. 133-158). Boston: College-Hill Press.

Blachman B., Ball E., Black R., & Tangel D. ( 1991). Promising practices for improving beginning reading instruction: Teaching phoneme awareness in the kindergarten classroom. Manuscript submitted for publication.

Bradley L. ( 1987, November). "Rhyme recognition and reading and spelling in young children". Paper presented at the Early Childhood Symposium on Preschaol Prevention of Reading Failure at the meeting of the Orton Dyslexia Society, San Francisco.

Bradley L., & Bryant P. ( 1983). "Categorizing sounds and learning to read: A causal connection". "Nature", 301, 419-421.

Bradley L., & Bryant P. ( 1985). Rhyme and reason in reading and spelling. International Academy for Research in Learning Disabilities Monograph Series, Number 1. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Chall J. ( 1983). Stages of reading development. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Gough P., & Juel C. ( 1987). The first stages of word recognition. Unpublished manuscript, University of Texas at Austin.

Gough P., & Tunmer W. ( 1986). "Decoding, reading, and reading disability". Remedial and Special Education, 7, 6-10.

Liberman I. ( 1971). "Basic research in speech and lateralization of language: Some implications for reading disability". Bulletin of the Orton Society, 21, 72-87.

Liberman I. ( 1983). A language-oriented view of reading and its disabilities. In H. Myklebust (Ed.), Progress in learning disabilities, 5 (pp. 81-101). New York: Grune & Stratton.

Liberman I., & Shankweiler D. ( 1985). "Phonology and the problems of learning to read and write". Remedial and Special Education, 6, 8-17.

Lundberg I., Frost J., & Petersen O. ( 1988). "Effects of an extensive program for stimulating phonological awareness in preschool children". Reading Research Quarterly, 23, 263-284.

Olofsson A., & Lundberg I. ( 1983). "Can phonemic awareness be trained in kindergarten?" Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 24, 35-44.

Olofsson A., & Lundberg I. ( 1985). "Evaluation of long-term effects of phonemic-awareness training in kindergarten: Illustrations of some methodological problems in evaluation research". Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 26, 21-34.

Perfetti C. ( 1985). Reading ability. New York: Oxford University Press.

Perfetti C., & Lesgold A. ( 1977). "Discourse comprehension and sources of individual differences".

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