Phonological Processes in Literacy: A Tribute to Isabelle Y. Liberman

By Susan A. Brady; Donald P. Shankweiler et al. | Go to book overview

ciple. Children must eventually learn the links between individual graphemes and individual phonemes (e.g., Gough and Walsh, this volume), but relationships between print and speech at the level of onsets and rimes might give them a way into the system. Research is needed to examine these proposals and find out how well they work. For example, is it true that phonemic analysis training programs that include an intermediate onset-rime step are more successful than programs that do not? At this point, we don't know the answer. However, we are optimistic that a detailed account of phonological awareness and its development -- an account that acknowledges the role of units smaller than the syllable and larger than the phoneme -- will ultimately lead to practical gains.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This research was supported by NICHD Grants HD20276 and HD00769.


REFERENCES

Baron J., & Treiman R. ( 1980). "Use of orthography in reading and learning to read". In J. F. Kavanagh & R. L. Venezky (Eds.), Orthography, reading, and dyslexia. Baltimore: University Park Press.

Barton D., Miller R., & Macken M. A. ( 1980). "Do children treat clusters as one unit or two?" Papers and Reports on Child Language Development, 18, 93-137.

Bertelson P. ( 1986). "The onset of literacy: Liminal remarks". Cognition, 24, 1-30.

Bradley L., & Bryant P. E. ( 1983). "Categorizing sounds and learning to read-a causal connection". Nature, 301, 419-421.

Brady S., Shankweiler D., & Mann V. ( 1983). "Speech perception and memory coding in relation to reading ability". Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 35, 345-367.

Bruck M., & Treiman R. ( 1990). "Phonological awareness and spelling in normal children and dyslexics: The case of initial consonant clusters". Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 50, 156-178.

Clements G. N., & Keyser S. J. ( 1983). CV phonology: A generative theory of the syllable. Cambridge: MIT Press.

Dow M. L. ( 1987). The psychological reality of sub-syllabic units. Doctoral thesis, Department of Linguistics, University of Alberta.

Fox B., & Routh D. K. ( 1975). "Analyzing spoken language into words, syllables, and phonemes: A developmental study". Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 4, 331-342.

Fudge E. C. ( 1969). "Syllables". Journal of Linguistics, 5, 253-286.

Fudge E. ( 1987). "Branching structure within the syllable". Journal of Linguistics, 23, 359-377.

Golinkoff R. M. ( 1978). "Phonemic awareness skills and reading achievement". In P. Murray & J. Pikulski (Eds.), The acquisition of reading. Baltimore: University Park Press.

Hardy M., Stennett R. G., & Smythe P. C. ( 1973). "Auditory segmentation and auditory blending in relation to beginning reading". The Alberta Journal of Educational Research, 19, 144-158.

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