Phonological Processes in Literacy: A Tribute to Isabelle Y. Liberman

By Susan A. Brady; Donald P. Shankweiler et al. | Go to book overview

hindering speech perception and production. As discussed in this chapter, it also has the important consequence of limiting the development and the efficiency of phonological coding, which has consequences for the verbal short-term memory processes that underlie reading.


REFERENCES

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Conrad R. ( 1979). The deaf schoolchild. London: Harper & Row.

Dodd B. ( 1987). "Lip-reading, phonological coding and deafness". In B. Dodd & R. Campbell (Eds.), Hearing by eye: The psychology of lip-reading (pp. 177-189). London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

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Hanson V. L. ( 1989). "Phonology and reading: Evidence from profoundly deaf readers". In D. /> Shankweiler & I. Y. Liberman (Eds.), Phonology and reading disability: Solving the reading puzzle (pp. 69-89). Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Hanson V. L. ( 1990). "Recall of order information by deaf signers: Phonetic coding in temporal order recall". Memory & Cognition, 18, 604-610.

Hanson V. L., Goodell E. W., & Perfetti C. A. ( 1991). "Tongue-twister effects in the silent reading of deaf college students". Journal of Memory and Language, 30, 319-330.

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Liberman I. Y. ( 1971). "Basic research in speech and lateralization of language: Some implications for reading disability". Bulletin of the Orton Society, 21, 71-87.

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