Phonological Processes in Literacy: A Tribute to Isabelle Y. Liberman

By Susan A. Brady; Donald P. Shankweiler et al. | Go to book overview

different span measurements other than the ones on which they were selected.

A second explanation would involve the acquisition by the three improved subjects of more sophisticated mnemonic strategies as an aid to performance on span tasks. Whereas it is clear that such strategies can improve performance on span tasks, it is not clear that they would be useful as a a memory support during reading ( Torgesen, Kistner, & Morgan, 1988). Thus, this explanation could not account for the comparable reading scores between the improved LD-S and the LD-N group. The last explanation, of course, is that these three (or at least two of them) subjects simply underwent marked improvement in their phonological coding skills over the past 9 years; that is, they may have been suffering a severe developmental lag in maturation of the brain systems that support phonological processing at age 10, but between ages 10 and 19, the particular brain system in question attained a more normal level of development.

In focusing on the three subjects who showed improvement in span performance over the past 9 years, we should not overlook the fact that approximately 60% of the LD-S children showed striking continuities in their span performance over a very long period of time. Further, these continued difficulties in coding the phonological features of verbal stimuli were associated with virtually no improvement in basic reading skills over the same period of time. Although these findings are admittedly preliminary, they suggest that the difficulties in phonological processing identified by poor performance on span tasks meet at least some of the requirements for explaining the intransigent nature of many reading difficulties. As such an explanation, they may not only account for difficulties in learning to read, but difficulties in attaining normal levels of awareness of the phonological features of language.


REFERENCES

Ball E. W., & Blachman B. A. ( 1988). Phoneme segmentation training: Effect on reading readiness. Unpublished manuscript, Syracuse University.

Campione J. C. ( 1989). "Assisted assessment: A taxonomy of approaches and an outline of strengths and weaknesses". Journal of Learning Disabilities, 22, 151-165.

Horn W. F., O'Donnell J. P., & Vitulano L. A. ( 1983). "Long-term follow-up studies of learning disabled persons". Journal of Learning Disabilities, 16, 542-555.

Lundberg I., Frost J., & Peterson O. ( 1988). "Effects of an extensive program for stimulating phonological awareness in prc-school children". Reading Research Quarterly, 23, 263-284.

Shankweiler D., Liberman I. Y., Mark L. S., Fowler L. A., & Fisher F. W. ( 1979). "The speech code and learning to read". Journal of Experimental Psychology, Human Learning and Memory, 5, 531-545.

Torgesen J. K. ( 1978). "Performance of reading disabled children on serial memory tasks: A review". Reading Research Quarterly, 19, 57-87.

-192-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Phonological Processes in Literacy: A Tribute to Isabelle Y. Liberman
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.