Decision Making in the Workplace: A Unified Perspective

By Lee Roy Beach | Go to book overview

4
CAREER DECISIONS

Cynthia Kay Stevens

University of Maryland

You are almost finished with your degree and are unsure of what you want to do next. Initially, you thought about going into consulting, but an internship convinced you that the long hours, travel, and continual "wooing" of clients were not for you. Your focus then shifted to management, but your résumé's career objective ("interested in management position with opportunities to utilize my diverse talents") has not exactly sent interviewers stampeding to your door. Should you try a different degree program? (You have often thought about becoming a counselor.) Or should you keep your part-time bartending job until a management position turns up?

One of your subordinates, Chris, comes to you for advice. Chris has been a solid, productive performer in your division for 15 years. When a project manager position opened up two months ago, Chris lobbied hard for the promotion. However, the job ultimately went to another person. Because of the glut of talented employees at Chris's level, Chris probably will never be promoted into management. Yet you would hate to lose Chris's practical and technical expertise. What advice or recommendations can you offer Chris?

Your uncle has worked for 30 years on the assembly line at a midsize manufacturing company. In the past few years, however, his company has been losing money. It recently announced that it will close its U.S. plants, putting hundreds of employees (including your uncle) out of work. Your uncle is unlikely to find a comparable job unless he moves to an area with a stronger economy. Yet he and your aunt cannot bear to leave their family and friends. The company has provided funds to retrain displaced workers, but your uncle (who is depressed and apathetic) has not participated in this

-49-

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Decision Making in the Workplace: A Unified Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1: Image Theory, the Unifying Perspective 1
  • References 19
  • 2: Why a New Perspective on Decision Making is Needed 21
  • References 30
  • 3: Job Search and Job Selection 33
  • Conclusions 46
  • References 46
  • 4: Career Decisions 49
  • Conclusions 61
  • References 62
  • 5: Supervision and Job Satisfaction 63
  • References 71
  • 6: Why Employees Quit 73
  • Conclusion 89
  • References 89
  • 7: Audit Decisions 91
  • Summary 99
  • References 99
  • 8: Screening of Clients by Audit Firms 101
  • Conclusions 115
  • References 116
  • 9: Organizational Culture and Decision Making 117
  • Summary and Practical Implications 129
  • References 131
  • 10: Mitigating Cultural Constraints on Group Decisions 133
  • Conclusion 141
  • References 142
  • 11: Imagination and Planning 143
  • References 153
  • 12: Designing Marketing Plans and Communication Strategies 155
  • Summary and Conclusions 164
  • References 164
  • 13: Consumer Decisions Involving Social Responsibility 165
  • Conclusion 177
  • References 179
  • 14: Image Compatibility and Framing 181
  • References 193
  • 15: Image Theory and Workplace Decisions: Challenges 197
  • References 208
  • Author Index 209
  • Subject Index 215
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