Decision Making in the Workplace: A Unified Perspective

By Lee Roy Beach | Go to book overview

Regardless of the image targeted in marketing communications, the social marketer's goal would be the use of all three interrelated images to frame the decision and an increase in the probability that a proenvironmental choice would result. Because a large segment of the population has been identified as proenvironmental, a social responsibility attribute such as product greenness becomes a competitive advantage. If the social responsibility attribute is used to screen alternatives, other attributes cannot compensate for shortcomings in this area. Despite commonly held beliefs that green products are slightly more expensive and less effective ( The Roper Organization, 1990), the price and quality attributes might not enter the decision until those that violate the green screening criterion have been eliminated.

The above strategies for influencing consumer decisions involve manipulating the decision frame for consumers who already are socially responsible and concerned about the environment. Changing an individual's value system is difficult, time consuming, and perhaps not reasonably possible. However, it is possible to increase general public awareness of social responsibilities and existing problems through educational and public relations efforts. As awareness increases, it is possible that knowledge structures will be created so that the individual can develop and use these environmentally related images to make decisions.

In more general terms, the image theory perspective emphasizes the importance of the consumer's values and principles on consumption decisions, whether they are simple or complex. Decision making under image theory demands consistency between the value, trajectory, and strategic images while the cognitive effort is conserved through profitability-compatibility tests and adoption-progress decisions. The ability of image theory to simply, but elegantly, describe the decision making process for complex, value laden decisions involving social responsibility issues is strong evidence of its value in explaining all types of consumer decision making.


REFERENCES

Barclay D. W., Higgins C., & Thompson R. (in press). "The partial least squares (PLS) approach to causal modeling: Personal computer adoption and use as an illustration [special issue)". Technology Studies.

Beach L. R. ( 1990). Image theory: Decision making in personal and organizational contexts. Chichester, UK: Wiley.

Berger I. E., & Corbin. R. M. ( 1992). "Perceived consumer effectiveness and faith in others as moderators of environmentally responsible behaviors". Journal of Public Policy and Marketing, 11, 79-89.

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Decision Making in the Workplace: A Unified Perspective
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • 1: Image Theory, the Unifying Perspective 1
  • References 19
  • 2: Why a New Perspective on Decision Making is Needed 21
  • References 30
  • 3: Job Search and Job Selection 33
  • Conclusions 46
  • References 46
  • 4: Career Decisions 49
  • Conclusions 61
  • References 62
  • 5: Supervision and Job Satisfaction 63
  • References 71
  • 6: Why Employees Quit 73
  • Conclusion 89
  • References 89
  • 7: Audit Decisions 91
  • Summary 99
  • References 99
  • 8: Screening of Clients by Audit Firms 101
  • Conclusions 115
  • References 116
  • 9: Organizational Culture and Decision Making 117
  • Summary and Practical Implications 129
  • References 131
  • 10: Mitigating Cultural Constraints on Group Decisions 133
  • Conclusion 141
  • References 142
  • 11: Imagination and Planning 143
  • References 153
  • 12: Designing Marketing Plans and Communication Strategies 155
  • Summary and Conclusions 164
  • References 164
  • 13: Consumer Decisions Involving Social Responsibility 165
  • Conclusion 177
  • References 179
  • 14: Image Compatibility and Framing 181
  • References 193
  • 15: Image Theory and Workplace Decisions: Challenges 197
  • References 208
  • Author Index 209
  • Subject Index 215
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