Social Change and Innovation in the Labour Market: Evidence from the Census SARs on Occupational Segregation and Labour Mobility, Part-Time Work and Student Jobs, Homework and Self-Employment

By Catherine Hakim | Go to book overview

10
Conclusions

Research on the labour market in the late twentieth century has tended to focus on perennial problems, such as unemployment and discrimination, or on the impact of changes in information and communication technologies ( Daniel, 1987; Howard, 1995), economic shocks, and major swings in government policy ( Boyer, 1989; Michie, 1992). This study has focused on the impact of social changes that produce less dramatic and sometimes invisible processes of gradual change and innovation in the labour market. The longterm impact of changes in sex-role attitudes, the feminization of the workforce, the prolongation of full-time education beyond adolescence and into early adulthood, the upskilling of the workforce, and the increased weight placed on autonomy and the exercise of skill by highly educated workers-- all these have been slow and continuous processes of social change rather than attention-grabbing sudden events. As Lieberson ( 1985: 183-5) points out, it is easy to underestimate their cumulative, long-term impact. The innovations they produce remain hidden in part because labour market statistics are churned out on a regular basis to largely predetermined formats, using fixed definitions and classifications. What we perceive is shaped by theoretical and common-sense preconceptions about what it is we are looking for. Academic discipline-based theory produces just as many blind spots as policy-oriented inquiries. Both perspectives are disabling in different ways.


OCCUPATIONAL SEGREGATION AS
A STRUCTURAL FEATURE OF THE LABOUR MARKET

Research on occupational segregation has so far been dominated by the search for an ideal single-number index which could be used to measure the pace of change over time in individual countries or groups of countries ( Hakim, 1993b, 1993c; Watts, 1993; J. Jacobs, 1989a; Siltanen, Jarman, and Blackburn, 1995). The new approach applied throughout this book was more fruitful than expected, revealing that occupational segregation is not just a useful theoretical concept but also a concrete, structural feature of the labour market. Labour market analyses using the new typology of male-dominated, female-dominated, and integrated or mixed occupations reveal fundamental differences between integrated occupations and segregated occupations, and

-235-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Social Change and Innovation in the Labour Market: Evidence from the Census SARs on Occupational Segregation and Labour Mobility, Part-Time Work and Student Jobs, Homework and Self-Employment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 318

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.