Traditional Chinese Fiction and Fiction Commentary: Reading and Writing between the Lines

By David L. Rolston | Go to book overview

Glossary-Index
In this index, an "f" after a page number indicates a separate reference on the next page, and an "ff" indicates separate references on the next two pages. A continuous discussion is indicated by a span of page numbers, e.g., "57-59." Passim is used for a cluster of references in close but not consecutive sequence. Entries are alphabetized letter by letter, ignoring word breaks, syllable divisions, hyphens, and accents, with the exception of personal names, which are alphabetized first under the surname and then under the given name.
abridged editions, 33n, 65n, 76; poetry in, 237-38
abuse, terms of, in commentaries: bad reader, 152, 178, 348; clumsy, 325n; crazy person listening to talk of dreams, 173, 181; dolts, 152, 179ff; dullards, 130; hack, 235, 286; numbskull, 181; ordinary fiction, 110, 306, 333; shtick, 233, 238, 325; stereotyped, 333; village know-it-alls, 53n; vulgar 180, 325, 346; without interest, 113, 239
accretive stage, 7, 218
actors edit plays, 258n
adumbration, 163n
advance insertion, 249f, 321f
advance mention, 249, 303-4n
advertisements for commentary, 283
Aenead, 12, 17n
aesthetic distance, 66, 82, 97-98, 178, 243-44,328
Aethiopica, 230
affective-expressive theory of literature, 126
ai er zhi qi e, zeng er zhi qi shan 142
Aina jushi, 122
allegoresis, 167, 171
allegory,77-78, 82-84, 152, 171, 309; and history, 146, 154f; and mistakes, 66n, 84, 114-15, 157, 180- 82. See also Jin Ping Mei; Xiyou ji
allusion, 5
alternation, 256ff, 322, 330n
amateur storytelling, 281
ambiguous characters, 192, 220, 347
amnesty, 27ff, 30, 35f, 263
an , 114n, 287ff, 342, 346
An Daoquan , 178
An Xuehai , 305
anachronisms, 180-81
analepsis, 250
anatomy, 256n
ancient text, see guben
Anderson, Marston, 215n
annal, 145
annals and biography form, 141
Anno, Mitsumasa, 15n

-383-

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