U.S. Domestic and National Security Agendas: Into the Twenty-First Century

By Sam C. Sarkesian; John Mead Flanagin et al. | Go to book overview

About the Editors and Contributors

ADDA B. BOZEMAN is Professor Emeritus at Sarah Lawrence College. She has published numerous articles and books on international history, foreign policy, and intercultural relations, including her most recent book, Strategic Intelligence and Statecraft. Ms. Bozeman is a member of the board of founding directors of the Consortium for the Study of Intelligence and was a barrister at the Middle Temple Inn of Court, London.

STEPHEN DAGGETT is a specialist in National Defense in the Foreign Affairs and National Defense Division of the Congressional Research Service at the Library of Congress. He was previously affiliated with the Center for Defense Information, where he served as a budget analyst, and he has written extensively on defense budget issues.

MARK J. EITELBERG a nationally recognized authority on military manpower policy, is currently Associate Professor of Public Administration in the Department of Administrative Sciences, U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California. Dr. Eitelberg is author or coauthor of more than fifty publications and several books on military manpower topics. He is coauthor of Marching Toward the 21st Century ( Greenwood, 1994).

JOHN MEAD FLANAGIN is Research Director at the National Strategy Forum in Chicago. Trained in U.S. Diplomatic History at the American University and the University of Chicago, he writes frequently on foreign affairs and the policy-making process.

GREGORY D. FOSTER is J. Carlton Ward Distinguished Professor and Director of Research at the Industrial College of the Armed Forces, National Defense University. He is also an adjunct faculty member at Johns Hopkins University. His numerous publications include The Strategic Dimension ofMilitary Power and Paradoxes of Power: The Military Establishment in the Eighties

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