Atypical Cognitive Deficits in Developmental Disorders: Implications for Brain Function

By Sarah H. Broman; Jordan Grafman | Go to book overview
Save to active project

2
Williams Syndrome: An Unusual Neuropsychological Profile

Ursula Bellugi The Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Paul P. Wang The Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Terry L. Jernigan Veterans Affairs Medical Center and UCSD School of Medicine

As a genetic experiment of nature, Williams syndrome (WS) is expressed on multiple biological levels. Ultimately, WS presents an unusual neurobehavioral profile, affording the opportunity to study both neurobiology and neuropsychology within a single, genetically defined paradigm. The Salk Institute's Laboratory for Cognitive Neuroscience (LCN) has been engaged in a comprehensive program of study that spans multiple biological levels in WS. These levels include the linguistic, the neuropsychological, the neuroanatomic, the neurophysiologic, and the genetic. The fundamental goal of these combined investigations is to help elucidate the brain bases of behavior.

In this chapter, we first present the unusual neuropsychological profile of WS, a profile of peaks and valleys of abilities within and across domains of higher cognitive functioning. We then review the results of recent studies on the neuroanatomic basis of WS and its neurophysiological characteristics, and the implications of this research program for an understanding of the neural systems that subserve language and cognitive functioning. A more complete discussion of the neuroanatomic and neurophysiologic investigations in WS is presented in the chapters that follow. Important to note, these cross- disciplinary studies are all carried out on the same subjects, and thus give us the unusual opportunity to relate findings from cognitive, neuroanatomical, and neurophysiological levels.

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Atypical Cognitive Deficits in Developmental Disorders: Implications for Brain Function
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 338

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?