The Road from Rio: Sustainable Development and the Nongovernmental Movement in the Third World

By Julie Fisher | Go to book overview

The effectiveness of GRSOS, horizontal networks of GROs and GRSOS, and their ultimate impact on governments and other outsiders depends on the groups at the bottom of the organizational pyramid. This chapter has dealt with some of the failures and frustrations of GROS. But there is an immense body of evidence that GROs are not only the strongest and broadest part of the pyramid, they are also the sine qua non of effective and sustainable development. The yields for rain-fed farmers in Kenya who belonged to GROs were significantly higher than for those who did not belong, even though GRO members had lower ratios of extension agents per farmer than did nonmembers. And in Zimbabwe, the positive impact of membership in GROs became more powerful as rainfall and soil conditions worsened. 146

The potential implications of the growth of GROs to institutional development do not only relate to their economic achievements. Equally crucial is the political role that the newly empowered will play, in conjunction with GRO networks, GRSOs, and even GRSO networks. Although the political role of GROs will be more fully explored in Volume 2, their relationships with other NGOs are explored more fully in the chapters that follow.


NOTES
1.
A grassroots leader, quoted in Rahman, 1981, p. 44.
2.
Interview, September 1991.
3.
I owe this insight to Estelle James.
4.
Fishel, 1979.
5.
Etling, 1975, pp. 96-97.
6.
See Garner, 1982, p. 107, for example.
7.
Smith, 1987a, p.6. Wisely, Oxfam withdrew funding.
8.
The phrase is from Lutheran World Relief's publications.
9.
Ergas, 1986, p. 323.
10.
Pradervand visited 100 villages in Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Zimbabwe, and Kenya during 1987. See Pradervand 1990.
11.
Bratton, 1983.
12.
See Annis, 1987, and Fisher, 1984.
13.
Vetter, 1986, p. 3.
14.
See Smith, 1990, p. 261 and Koldewyn, 1986, p. 46.
15.
Eldridge, 1984-85, p. 44; De los Reyes, 1986; Njonkou, 1986, p. 82.
16.
They are supported by organizations in 3,176 villages, 399 unions, 65 upazillas, 22 districts, and 49 training centers ( Khan, 1991; Crossette, 1991).
17.
Crossette, 1988:A3.
18.
Meeting with Middle East Division, Save the Children, 1989.
19.
Van Nieuwenhuijze et al., 1985. See also Ralston Anderson, and Colson ( 1983:90-91).
20.
Annis, 1987, p. 21.
21.
Pradervand, 1988, p. 8.
22.
Bletzer, 1977, p. 5.

-51-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Road from Rio: Sustainable Development and the Nongovernmental Movement in the Third World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface xi
  • Note xiv
  • Selected Acronyms xv
  • 1 - The Politics of Development 1
  • Notes 18
  • 2 - Grassroots Organizations (gros) 21
  • Notes 51
  • 3 - Gro Networks 57
  • Notes 72
  • 4 - Grassroots Support Organizations (grsos) 75
  • Notes 113
  • 5 - Poverty, Environmental Degradation, and Population Growth: The Role of Grsos 117
  • Notes 135
  • 6 - Grso Networks 139
  • Notes 159
  • 7 - What Works: Assessing the Performance of Gros and Grsos 163
  • Notes 183
  • 8 - Gro-Grso Linkages 187
  • Notes 211
  • Glossary 215
  • Bibliography 217
  • Index 243
  • About the Author 265
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.