The African American Theatre Directory, 1816-1960: A Comprehensive Guide to Early Black Theatre Organizations, Companies, Theatres, and Performing Groups

By Bernard L. Peterson Jr. | Go to book overview

E

EAST TENNESSEE COLORED MINSTRELS.SeeCOLORED MINSTRELS.

EATON & HOGAN'S COLORED MINSTRELS.SeeAppendix B(I)II.

EATON'S AFRO-AMERICAN VAUDEVILLE COMPANY.SeeAppendix B(2)11.

EATON'S COLORED BIG CITY SHOW // also known by numerous other titles cited in this entry. Variety troupe, active 1890s. The first black vaudeville specialty company. Organized by * Harry S. Eaton. This company toured under several different titles and managers. As Harry Eaton's Big City [Colored] Show, it opened in Philadelphia in Nov. 1891. As Harry Eaton's Colored Sports Co., it opened at Rocky Point, RI, in the summer of 1894. As Harry Eaton's Colored Big City Show, it opened at Miner's Bowery Th., NYC, Sept. 4, 1896, under the management of * Alf Weathers, with a company that included Eeaton & Weathers, * Billy Young, the * Oriole Quartet, * Herbert La She (and Ten Octoroon Ladies), Prof. * P. G. Lowery (bandleader), and Prof. Sam Schiller ( orchestra conductor). As Harry Eaton's Colored Sports Big City Show, it opened in Brooklyn, NY, in Oct. 1896, under the comanagement of the Melbourne Bros., with Harry Daley, manager, and a company that included Eaton & Weathers, * Billy Jackson, * Charles Hunn, and the Mobile Four (a quartet consisting of Messrs. Cummings, Heywood, Mercer, and Ray). In Dec. 1896, Harry Eaton's Colored Sports Co. was disbanded and reorganized in March 1897 as Eaton & Weathers' Colored Big City Sports Co., under the management of Alf Weathers. Under this title, it toured New England in 1897 with Eaton & Weathers, Nellie Eaton, *James and * Sue Grundy, * John Larkins, Billy

-63-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The African American Theatre Directory, 1816-1960: A Comprehensive Guide to Early Black Theatre Organizations, Companies, Theatres, and Performing Groups
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Notes xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Preface xxi
  • Abbreviations xxiii
  • SYMBOLS xxvii
  • A 3
  • B 26
  • C 38
  • D 54
  • E 63
  • F 69
  • G 77
  • H 85
  • I 104
  • J 106
  • K 110
  • L 116
  • M 131
  • N 142
  • O 157
  • P 161
  • Q-R 171
  • S 179
  • T 191
  • U-V 197
  • W-Y 200
  • Appendix A BLACK-ORIENTED AND BLACK­ CONTROLLED THEATRES, HALLS, AND PERFORMANCE SPACES 207
  • Appendix B CLASSIFICATION OF BLACK THEATRE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPANIES, AND PERFORMING GROUPS BY TYPE 215
  • INFORMATION SOURCES 239
  • INDEX OF NAMES 247
  • INDEX OF BLACK THEATRICAL ORGANIZATIONS AND THEATRES 271
  • INDEX OF SHOW TITLES 289
  • CONTRIBUTORS AND RESEARCH CONSULTANTS 299
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.