The African American Theatre Directory, 1816-1960: A Comprehensive Guide to Early Black Theatre Organizations, Companies, Theatres, and Performing Groups

By Bernard L. Peterson Jr. | Go to book overview

M

• McADOO'S MINSTREL AND VAUDEVILLE COMPANIES. Two main troupes were owned by O. M. McAdoo, 1897/ 1900. The first was 1 McAdoo's Minstrel & Vaudeville Co. ( 1897-98), which toured South Africa and Australia with great success. The Owl (Cape Town, South Africa, 8-28- 1897) praised the instrumental music, the "quaint plantation songs accompanied by the usual amount of humor from the end-men," the "excellent variety show . . . which introduced some marvelously clever juggling and some high kicking," and especially "'The Grand Cake Walk,' . . . [which] consisted of the company promenading in couples, the audience awarding the 'cake' to the most graceful couple." The governor of Cape Town attended one performance. According to Henry Sampson ( Ghost, p. 138), the company encountered "considerable race prejudice while touring South Africa and respond[ed] by inserting the following joke in one of their minstrel routines: One of the [end] men asks a brother where he would like to be buried when he dies? The brother replies that he would like to be buried in a quiet Methodist cemetery and asks where his questioner would like to be laid. The latter answers, 'In a Dutch Cemetery.''Why?' asks the brother. The answer is, 'Because a Dutch Cemetery is the last place the devil would go to look for a black man.' "

The second company was 2McAdoo's [Georgia] Minstrels & [Alabama] Cake Walkers Co. ( 1899-1900). This company successfully toured New Zealand and Australia, where Mr. McAdoo died in Sidney before the end of the tour. The company consisted of thirty-two people, who included Prof. * Henderson Smith ( bandmaster); Gerald Miller (interlocutor); Dave Barton, * Hen Wise, and Jackson Heard (end men; tambos; Hen Wise was also praised for his "clever impersonations and long shoe dancing"); George Henry (champion buck dancer); Mabel Heard (who perfd. with her husband Jackson Heard in an

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The African American Theatre Directory, 1816-1960: A Comprehensive Guide to Early Black Theatre Organizations, Companies, Theatres, and Performing Groups
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Notes xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Preface xxi
  • Abbreviations xxiii
  • SYMBOLS xxvii
  • A 3
  • B 26
  • C 38
  • D 54
  • E 63
  • F 69
  • G 77
  • H 85
  • I 104
  • J 106
  • K 110
  • L 116
  • M 131
  • N 142
  • O 157
  • P 161
  • Q-R 171
  • S 179
  • T 191
  • U-V 197
  • W-Y 200
  • Appendix A BLACK-ORIENTED AND BLACK­ CONTROLLED THEATRES, HALLS, AND PERFORMANCE SPACES 207
  • Appendix B CLASSIFICATION OF BLACK THEATRE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPANIES, AND PERFORMING GROUPS BY TYPE 215
  • INFORMATION SOURCES 239
  • INDEX OF NAMES 247
  • INDEX OF BLACK THEATRICAL ORGANIZATIONS AND THEATRES 271
  • INDEX OF SHOW TITLES 289
  • CONTRIBUTORS AND RESEARCH CONSULTANTS 299
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