Fernando Wood: A Political Biography

By Jerome Mushkat | Go to book overview

THIRTEEN
An Uncertain Majority

R ANDALL swung into a vigorous campaign to retain the Speakership shortly after the last barrier fell to Hayes's inauguration. Unlike two years earlier, he did everything possible to undercut Cox and Morrison, his chief rivals. Above all, Randall considered Wood indispensable. To a confidant, Randall wrote that although " Wood & I have never spoken on the subject," they made an implicit swap. For his aid, Randall agreed to name Wood "chairman [of] Ways and Means." At the moment, neither considered the chief liability in the deal -- their profound differences over the tariff -- and pushed ahead with single-minded dedication.1

Wood pulled powerful strings of money, organization, and influence. In New York, he lobbied hesitant financiers and congressmen, assuring them that Randall was safe on key fiscal issues. Within Tammany, he secured Kelly's endorsement by warning that Cox's candidacy was futile. During the summer, Wood spent a working holiday at Sharon Springs, pushing Randall among politicians vacationing from other states.2

The missing piece was the party's largest bloc of congressmen, sixty-seven Southern Democrats and their uncertain attitude toward Randall after the disputed election. While Randall called in political debts for past help he had given Southerners, Wood tested his own standing among them. It was firm. To most Southerners, Wood's racism was a vital part of their chief priority, preserving the racial order through home rule. His role in the presidential election was beside the point, then, especially since Hayes's Southern policy seemed to abandon blacks to their control.

Wood listened sympathetically to Southern grumbling about Randall's rulings and his negative attitude about subsidizing the Texas and Pacific Railroad. Wood soothed ruffled feelings through a network of congressional associates, and wrote pro-Randall editorials for the prestigious Charleston News and Courier, which Ben Wood partially owned, emphasizing Randall's belief in home rule. To three

-221-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fernando Wood: A Political Biography
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • One - The Beginning 1
  • Two - Foundations 13
  • Three - First Victory 31
  • Four - The Model Mayor 41
  • Five - The Political Mayor 63
  • Six - The Southern Candidate 82
  • Seven - The Southern Mayor 98
  • Eight - The Politics of Loyalty 116
  • Nine - The Peace Democrat 133
  • Ten - Political Exile 152
  • Eleven - The Politics of Frustration 170
  • Twelve - Congressional Leader 190
  • Thirteen - An Uncertain Majority 221
  • Fourteen - The Man and His Career 243
  • ABBREVIATIONS USED IN NOTES 248
  • Notes 249
  • Bibliography 293
  • Index 313
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 328

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.