Theatre U.S.A., 1665 to 1957

By Barnard Hewitt | Go to book overview
List of Illustrations
James Quin as Coriolanus, 174919
Elizabeth Hartley as Cleopatra in Dryden's All for Love, 177620
Charles Macklin as Shylock, 177720
David Garrick and Mrs. Pritchard in Macbeth, 177621
Interior of the Chestnut Street Theatre, Philadelphia, 179440
James Fennell as Macbeth at Covent Garden Theatre, 178742
Ann Brunton Merry as Calista in Nicholas Rowe's tragedy The Fair Penitent42
Joseph Jefferson I (left) and Francis Blissett in the farce A Budget of Blunders, c. 179652
The screen scene in Sheridan's comedy The School for Scandal with Park Theatre actors, c. 179854
Thomas A. Cooper as Pierre in Thomas Otway's tragedy Venice Preserved73
John Howard Payne as Rolla in Sheridan's heroic tragedy Pizarro81
George Frederick Cooke as Richard III83
Edmund Kean as Richard III, 181893
Junius Brutus Booth as Richard III98
Interior of the second Park Theatre, New York, 1822104
Edwin Forrest as Spartacus in Robert Montgomery Bird's tragedy The Gladiator106
Edwin Forrest in the title role of John Augustus Stone's Metamora108
Fanny Kemble as Juliet, Act II, Scene 2114
Mazeppa strapped to the back of the wild horse in the sensational drama based on Byron's poem117
A box at the theatre, 1832120
George Handel Hill as Hiram Dodge in The Yankee Pedlar, 1838125
Charlotte Cushman as Meg Merrilies in Guy Mannering130
Charlotte Cushman as Romeo and her sister Susan as Juliet132
Anna Cora Mowatt as Rosalind141

-ix-

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