Race, Ethnicity, and Minority Housing in the United States

By Jamshid A. Momeni | Go to book overview

Series Foreword

Leonard W. Doob

The Contributions in Ethnic Studies series focuses on the problems that arise when people with different cultures and goals come together and interact productively or tragically. The modes of adjustment and conflict are various, but usually one group dominates or attempts to dominate the other. Eventually some accommodation is reached: the process is likely to be long and, for the weaker group, painful. No one scholarly discipline monopolizes the research necessary to comprehend these intergroup relations. The emerging analysis, consequently, is of interest to historians, social scientists, psychologists, psychiatrists, and scholars in communication studies.

In the eleven contributions to this volume, edited by Professor Momeni, the control of access to adequate housing is viewed as one of the most significant indexes of relations between the American white majority and four ethnic groups: American Indians, Asians, Hispanics, and, above all, blacks. Within a family's home, living can be satisfactory or unsatisfactory, the potential for personal growth encouraging or discouraging. The authors have brought together and analyzed, in the best ecological and demographic traditions, available statistical information concerning the costs and distribution of rented and owned homes in the United States as well as the status of residential segregation in urban, suburban, and--for American Indians-- rural or traditional areas. Here we learn about the relevant and prosaic but significant details that affect human beings, such as overcrowding, plumbing, costs in relation to income, and the American version of what we have now learned elsewhere to call apartheid.

Certainly "a net penalty associated within being black" and the "large inequities" imposed by ethnicity are incisively documented with data ob

-xvii-

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